University of Central Florida

Letter to a Government Official (Legislator)

Purpose

In order to effectively lobby for or against an issue of concern, the Professional Nurse must be perceived as informed, professional and politically aware. This assignment is intended to help the student sharpen those skills, and perhaps even make an actual change in his or her community.

Remember the information about how an idea becomes a law? Well, here is your chance to influence the process! Have an idea of what you would like our government to do? Find out if there is already a Bill trying to survive the process and write to your Senator or Representative about it! Do you know of a Bill working its way through the process that you believe to be a horrible idea? Speak up!! Voice your opinion and desire to have the legislator who works for you vote it down!

General Instructions

Each student will choose a Bill that addresses an issue of concern to them or their community, that is connected to healthcare in an obvious way.

Here are some ideas to get you started:

  • Staffing levels of RNs
  • Health education in schools
  • Tobacco cessation campaign efforts
  • Injury prevention
  • Licensure or RNs maintaining the oversight of nursing practice with the Board of Nursing, rather than the Board of Medicine.

Here are some links to help you find your Legislators, and a Bill that interests you:

Who Represents Me?

SENATOR: Marco Rubio

SENATOR: Rick Scott

REPRESENTATIVE: Stephanie Murphy

GOVERNOR: Ron DeSantis

Federal Bills:

In the search bar, type in a health-related topic of interest to you

https://www.congress.gov/ (Links to an external site.)

State Bills:

Florida Senate:

https://www.flsenate.gov/Session/Bills/2020 (Links to an external site.)

Florida House of Representatives:

https://www.myfloridahouse.gov/Sections/Bills/bills.aspx

Students will draft a formal letter that may be be sent to their legislatorthe person who represents you and can vote on the issue.

  • Draft a formal Business Letter to a Legislator to persuade them either to support or reject the legislation you have identified. The Bill must be pending (‘live’) legislation. Bills that are ‘Dead’, ‘Tabled’ or Enacted (signed into Law) are not appropriate for the assignment.
  • The recipient must be someone who has power over (can vote on) the Bill of interest, and who represents you at the correct level of government! Please see the links above to find your legislators. You MUST put your actual address on the letter, so that the correct recipient (legislator) can be verified.
  • Be sure that you write to the correct person. If you are concerned about a Bill in the U.S. Senate (Congress), write to your U.S. Senator. If the Bill is at the State level, be sure to write to your State Senator. In other words, write to the person who represents you, based on your address, and who is at the correct level of government for the Bill you have chosen! This is where students run into the most trouble, so please be careful!
  • Citations and references are not necessary in a business letter.
  • The letter should be no more than one page. Legislators are notoriously busy people, so being succinct (getting straight to the point and stating your request clearly) is absolutely essential!

**For more information related to correct letter formatting, please begin with the OWL at Purdue Business Letter (Links to an external site.) for insights on proper formatting. Scroll to the bottom of the Purdue page to see an example of the required format.

University of Central Florida

Upload a short but organized essay of at least 350 words to “Project 1 Preliminary Reflection” in USF Writes reflecting on the following prompts:

  • What do you think writing effectively requires of a writer?
  • What are some key concepts about writing that you think are important to understand?
  • What do you think you need to work on most in order to make your writing more effective?
  • What kinds of writing do you imagine you’ll be doing in your academic discipline or future career
  • Analyzing Sources Exercise

  • Make notes about the sources you gathered for the initial research into this project – what did you find was difficult to summarize at length, or which sources that you summarized were not directly related to where you think you want to go with your essay. Identify sources that might not fit your needs any longer.Now evaluate your sources for the following:

    Authority and Credibility

    • Who is the author of each source – not the person, necessarily, but the publisher? Is it a recognizable source?
    • Is it a university press or an academic journal – these are considered more credible
    • Does the source include a works cited or bibliography – what sources did your source draw on? Does it include a wide variety of citations from other credible sources?
    • Does the author make a reasonable argument with a balance of views included?
    • Is there any indication the author has relevant expertise?
    • Is there depth to the information? Did it take you time to summarize?
    • Does the source provide links (if a web site) to similar sources and does it provide a date of last update for its pages or other information?

    Audience and Purpose

    • What is the tone of the source, the appearance of the source (if online or visual), and its intention?
    • Does it try to appeal to an audience in a way that indicates its purpose is to sell, persuade or influence?
    • Does it simply present information in an unbiased way?
    • Is it advocating for a cause or to raise funds?
    • Who is it aimed at – can you tell?
    • Sites and other sources with well-documented evidence and focused on scholarship or presenting facts in balanced ways will be most useful.

    Objectivity and Bias

    • Most sources provide a point of view or a bias that is implicit or explicit, but a strong source gives a balance – a range of views about the topic or issue.
    • Biased sources have no place in an academic essay, even if you counter that source with other, unbiased sources. A biased source is not credible because you can’t trust it – it is not objective. A source that can’t be trusted might do the following:
      • Make broad, sweeping claims
      • Use a tone that is unreasonable or excessive or over-the-top
      • Exaggerate its significance or value to the topic
      • Include no opposing views or provide only one view
      • Attack opposing views rather than consider them

    Relevance

    • Your sources should be relevant not just to the general topic, but to your essay’s purpose
    • How does it specifically address what you think might be your thesis, or the ideas you think you want to focus on in your essay?
    • How recent are your sources? Do you need something more updated?
    • Do your sources relate or is it a stretch to make them fit what you want to say? If so, you might need to find sources that are more relevant.
    • If the source is a web site, when was it last updated?

    Write a brief evaluation for each of your sources so far (at least two) using the prompts above. Which sources will you keep and which might you discard? What other sources do you need? What are the ideas you want to write about that need additional sources to support them? Which of your sources is lacking in credibility or relevance or accuracy, and therefore might need to be discarded?What is your plan for getting additional sources to support your essay?

University of Central Florida

PROJECT 3

The final project asks students to reflect on the research process, their own learning, and where they can take the skills and ideas from this class in the future. The guiding question for Project 3 are “How is researched information presented in a discipline, what concepts of writing are important for writers to consider?”

In Project Three, you will explore these questions: “How is researched information presented in a discipline, what concepts of writing are important for writers to consider, and

WHAT YOU’LL BE DOING

  • writing a prompted Reflection Essay of 3-5 pages minimum, connecting the research and writing knowledge you’ve developed through all the Projects over the semester, reflecting on how that writing knowledge might be used in future.
  • locating additional sources or examples of writing in your major (my major is Computer Science) or discipline that show how researched information is presented in that discipline (sources from P1 and P2 can be used if appropriate)
  • analyzing those sources by identifying the writing concepts that might be evident in them, or informed by them
  • reflecting on your knowledge about writing and your thinking about what is important to consider when approaching any writing situation

In Project Three, students move from conducting and presenting research to reflecting on how research is presented in publications of their academic major or discipline (or one they are considering), using the knowledge and practices they developed in the previous projects, and applying concepts learned in the course in analyzing it – what are the genres of writing in which research is featured, how is it cited in academic and non-academic contexts, how is it presented, considered, and analyzed in a particular discipline.

Students might explore scholarly works, key publications, professional outreach, and/or subject matter communication to understand how researched information is shared in their discipline. They will analyze what a writer in that discipline/career space might need to understand in order to engage in the writing of that discipline successfully. This will help students understand their discipline further, prepare for their continued learning as a writer in that discipline, and develop knowledge about the real-world applications of the writing they’ve started to learn about in 1102. This will also help students begin to develop awareness of primary sources and rhetorical moves used in their chosen field.

The knowledge we gather from research, as you did in P2, has a place in the world of information. There are more sources now than ever, and more reason than ever to understand how information relates to other information, how it works differently in various contexts and genres and for different audiences and is used in the world for various purposes. The old saying, “knowledge is power” holds – the more we know and understand the more power we have in a situation, or to understand something, or to achieve our goals. In order to understand what is being communicated, we must consider key concepts about writing and develop our knowledge about how to strategize writing in various situations.

University of Central Florida

Burke’s “Unending Conversation” Metaphor; Connecting Projects

When dealing with academic research, it helps to approach “research” as a large, continual discussion that we are only partly-present for. Thinking this way allows us, as readers and researchers, to see there is no finish-line; meaning, no matter how much research we do, or the lengths to which we explore our topics, there will always be more to learn about the topic. Through this lens, we can see how the work we do in P1 and P2 is never fully actualized, but rather contributes to the larger discourse surrounding our research topics.

Prompt

Metaphor: In 1939, Kenneth Burke created the “Unending Conversation” metaphor about entering a parlor. It goes:

“Imagine that you enter a parlor. You come late. When you arrive, others have long preceded you, and they are engaged in a heated discussion, a discussion too heated for them to pause and tell you exactly what it is about. In fact, the discussion had already begun long before any of them got there, so that no one present is qualified to retrace for you all the steps that had gone before. You listen for a while, until you decide that you have caught the tenor of the argument; then you put in your oar. Someone answers; you answer him; another comes to your defense; another aligns himself against you, to either the embarrassment or gratification of your opponent, depending upon the quality of your ally’s assistance. However, the discussion is interminable. The hour grows late, you must depart. And you do depart, with the discussion still vigorously in progress.”

In-Class Reading: Research as a conversation: Burke’s Parlor Tricks: Introducing Research as Conversation | Library Babel Fish (Links to an external site.)

Once you’re done reading, engage in the class discussion concerning the connections you see between the parlor metaphor and the projects (P1 & P2) you’ve been asked to do. P1 can largely be seen as the conversation you listen to upon arriving in the parlor, and P2 is when you begin contributing to the conversation in progress.

Seeing research in terms of an unending conversation can help you realize that your project will not be the definitive end of a conversation or topic. Rather, P1 introduces you to a research topic and familiarizes you with the tenor of discourse. Once the “Research Topic Proposal” has been completed, you time “listening” in the parlor ends. Then, as you begin writing the “Research Essay,” this is where you begin contributing to the current discourse in and around the topic. Ask yourself, how did the “listening” you did in P1 helped prepare you to “enter the conversation” of P2.

Questions:

  • What connections did you draw from both the readings and class discussion about the potential connection (or lack thereof) between Burke’s metaphor and your research process?
  • Did you gain any insight about research, the research process, or the evolution of ideas? Explain
  • What was one quote, either from the reading, a classmate, or your instructor that stood out to you and why?
  • Respond with your interpretation of this statement: “research is an iterative process.”

University of Central Florida

This discussion post is optional but if you create an original post AND comment on someone else’s post in a constructive and reflective manner, you can earn 2 points extra credit per module discussion post. Posts are due by NOON Wednesday each week. Please use full sentences and proper grammar and punctuation. You cannot post in later weeks to this discussion hoping to earn extra credit.

For this module, reflect on the following:

In the twenty-first century, we have more media options available to us than ever before. But most of the major media outlets are owned by a small number of corporations. Given this, do you believe that we as media consumers have more or fewer choices than in the past? What is the potential impact of fewer corporations owning more of your media options? Please provide examples to support your position. Make sure you respond a classmate with more than an “I agree.”

POST 1

I think this statement brings a lot of things into question. With us being in the 21st Century we do have many more media outlets and options then we ever did many years ago. However, with most of the different kinds of outlets being owned by the same small number of corporations it does it limit what we are given and shown. In my mind, a good way to describe the situation (that makes sense to me at least) is that yes our media outlets are limited but they are also broadened by the outlets created within. Even with saying that there is the knowledge and acknowledgement of what we know we don’t have and what we are not given access too. All in all, I think if we just take what is given we do have less choices than we would have if we were to take the time to look into and investigate what we have and don’t have.

University of Central Florida

This assessment method is designed to help you see how logic is used (or misused) in everyday life, and thereby appreciate the importance of good reasoning. You are asked to do some fieldwork related to logic. In particular, you are asked to document an argument “in the wild,” that is, an argument someone makes during a debate, a dispute, or a disagreement as you witness it in everyday life. The argument cannot be taken from a book or an article. You may use various mediums to document this “argument in the wild,” such as text, image, audio, or video. Then you should analyze the argument using the logical tools we learn throughout this course. For the second Argument in the Wild, you should write the argument in canonical form and then evaluate it, that is, determine whether the argument is valid or invalid, using a Venn diagram. If the argument is valid, determine whether it is sound or unsound.

Here is an example of what an “Arguments in the Wild 2” submission should look like:

In this video, Trevor Noah discusses the following argument, which is made by the CEO of CBS, Les Moonves: “The money’s rolling in… This is going to be a very good year for us. Sorry, it’s a terrible thing to say, but, bring it on, Donald.”

Moonves’ argument in this video can be reconstructed in canonical form as follows:

P1: Anything that brings in money is good for CBS.

P2: Trump’s presidential bid brings in money.

Therefore,

C: Trump’s presidential bid is good for CBS.

Reconstructed in this way, Moonves’ argument is valid; that is, if P1 and P2 are true, then C would have to be true as well. Indeed, the argument is an AAA-1 categorical syllogism.

S: Things identical with Trump’s presidential bid

P: Things that are good for CBS

M: Things that bring in money

All M are P.

All S are M.

All S are P.

AAA-1.gif

Since the argument is valid, the question is whether the premises are in fact true. Is the argument sound? If the only thing that CBS cares about is the bottom line, then it would follow that Trump’s presidential bid is good for CBS, given that it is good for CBS’s bottom line. However, it might be argued that CBS, as a major source of news, has a journalistic responsibility to the American public. If the American public loses trust in CBS, upon finding out that CBS reports only the news that bring in money, then that could also hurt CBS’s bottom line.

Since there are doubts about whether the premises are true, although Moonves’ argument can be reconstructed as a valid categorical syllogism, it cannot be said to be sound.

This, then, is how your second “Arguments in the Wild” assignment should look like. That is, you should use the tools of Categorical Logic (in particular, Venn diagrams) to analyze one argument in the wild. You should determine whether the argument is valid or invalid by means of a Venn diagram. If valid, you should determine whether the argument is sound or unsound.

University of Central Florida

I need an explanation for this Communications question to help me study.

How do you feel about television programs or movies featuring sponsored products within the show? Do you find product placement more annoying in scripted programs or movies than in reality shows? Why or why not? Use some examples of product placement you have seen in tv shows or movies.

Peer Response

When it comes to television shows or movies featuring sponsored products in the media, I really do not mind it, unless the show or movie is heavily pushing the product. Most of the sponsored products in a show or movie are subliminally placed and are only brought to the audience’s eyes in certain shots of certain scenes. I think product placement in a television show is more annoying than in a movie because it is something they can harp on or push for several episodes. When it comes to a movie it’s a 2 to three hour block where that product may be featured a few times and that is it. The product placement example that comes to mind that worked great was in Jurassic Park with the Barbasol container. I think this product placement was done very well because while the product is seen multiple times throughout the film, they show its actual use as shaving cream, but for the film’s purpose it doubled as a device to carry dinosaur embryos. It was product placement but also served a purpose to further the plot in the film. The television show I can think of where the product placement is done okay is in the show All American. The product is the Microsoft tablet and it is constantly shown throughout the series when there is a computer on a desk. I do not think All American does a bad job at product placement and it also serves a purpose as being game film for the players and coaches, but the Barbasol can was better placed, in my opinion. 

University of Central Florida

Hello, NOTE THAT IF YOU TAKE THIS QUESTION I WILL INVITE YOU FOR MY FINAL PROJECT TO THE CLASS WHICH WILL BE 40$ QUESTION!!

Write a paper about:

Part 1: After watching Real Value in full, and after reading about Homeboy Industries, thoroughly analyze Homeboy Industries in terms of its Real Value.

Part 2: While philanthropy is good, evaluate Kevin Trapani’s statements that “philanthropy is the old way,” and “all profits are not created equal. Evaluate social enterprise in relation to these statements.

Part 3: The final project involves designing a solution. Identify the problem that you are choosing to address with your final project in this class. What would you like to do about it? What can you do about it? Who else has tried to address this problem? In what ways have they succeeded? Where have they had difficulty?

I have had a discussion about Homeboy industries in the past and here it is:

Q: What do you think about Homeboy Industries? Why do you think this social enterprise is effective?

One of the barriers to full participation in society is that when people return to society from prison, they often have a hard time getting employed–leading people to return to a life of crime. What do you think could remove that barrier? Why does that barrier exist to begin with? What are people’s beliefs and assumptions around the kinds of issues Homeboy industries tries to address?

Answer: My opinion on Homeboy Industries is that it is a great social enterprise as it has given hope to so many people who had previously no hope in their life. I view this enterprise as a lifesaving industry since, through the hope it has shared with its members, some of them who were previously contemplating suicide no longer feel like that. I believe this enterprise is successful because it has always ensured that it can attain its goal.

To remove that barrier, the community should first be taught to stop judging ex-convicts. It is the first step towards removing that barrier. Additionally, the government could chip in and make it necessary that every big company hires at least two or three ex-convicts at their workplaces, this issue exists because people in the outside world believe that once a person becomes a criminal, they can never change. And that is why, even after criminals have served their time and come back to the world, people still fear them, and as a result, they discriminate against them. 

University of Central Florida

1- I am reading Dinty Moore’s book about crafting the personal essay. and he gives tips about how a Contemplative Essay should look like. I’ll attach screenshots for the chapter for you to read and consider the tips he talked about.  Polish this essay up as much as you can, and please give me a heads up on what are you thinking of writing about to see if it’s what I’m looking for! Also, make the essay emotional for readers to connect with it.

2- For the Journal it is a writing exercise about: Pick one childhood memory: something seemingly inconsequential but fun to remember, like my smoky the bagle story. Maybe for you, it is a hole in the back fence that opened into a field, a broad limb of a tree that made for comfortable sitting, the coolness of your grandmother basement in the summer, or the day your mother put Kool-aid in the ice tray and surprised you and your friends with homemade popsicles. 

Capture that memory as best as you can on the page, but then go on a chase, ramble through thickets of thought, pursue your own brief glimmer of fuzzy truth. Why do you retain the memory of that moment all of those years later? Other than just being a pleasant recollection, what deeper resonance is hidden in your story? what have you lost over the years, and can never get it back?

Childhood Memory:

well, I would say maybe when I made a friend for the first time outside of school, I went to elementary school in Bahrain for 4 years before I got back to my home country, I remember I used to be with my family all the time after school, my dad would go and play father-child games with us, we would go outdoors and play soccer with him, at the time I and my brothers were 4, one of which was a baby, I was the second son, so it would be me my older brother(Ibrahim) and my younger brother (Faris) and my dad. Sometimes we go to the beach and play there, although my father would be with my mom and grandma chilling while sees us play, he would find time to play with us some games or swim with us. We would go to the mosque together all the time, the mosque was close so we walked every day, usually, when we walk we play around with my dad while he walked looking at his phone or watching and commenting on how funny I fell or how I should stop bullying Faris(my younger), we were loud and happy, sometimes we would bike there and back, our neighbors usually smile at us while greeting dad, I think we brought joy as I would imagine seeing kids play around their dad I would be all smiles and remember the old days, one of our neighbors had a son named Khalid, he would always see us around but we never actually met. one day we had just got back from the mosque as usual and my mom was preparing dinner as we were watching cartoon in our room, and my dad was watching tv in the living room, my grandma was on the phone talking to her other sons whom are in my home country, oh and my grandma was living with us. our door rang, and I rushed to the door racing my older brother Ibrahim, we would always race to see who knocked on the door. When I opened the door, it was our neighbor whom I always saw walking with his only son to the mosque, he said hello I said hi as I heard my dad asking who was he, Ibrahim answered my dad “He is our neighbor”, my dad came to greet him, he smiled and behind him was his son Khalid looking at us behind his dad, he was shy, his dad said to me and my dad that he always saw us walk around and his son wanted to be friends with us, he said he was crying at home so he brought him to us to make friends haha, ofcourse we became friends straight away, but funny how we met, it was my first time meeting a friend who wanted to be friends with me badly as he cried to his dad to come with him to meet us! We started playing outside with our bikes the following days, cruise around the neighborhood, racing, going between cars, and sometimes go to the supermarket. With days he became more my friend than my brothers, it was mostly because my dad bought playstaiton 2 and my brothers were occupied with it that they didn’t want to go play outside. Our friendship got stronger so we would hang out in each others houses. I’m friends with him to this day. 

University of Central Florida

Stephens JD, Yager AM, & Allen J. (2017). Smartphone technology and text messaging for weight loss in young adults: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 32(1), 39–46. https://doi.org/10.1097/JCN.0000000000000307

  1. Was the design experimental, quasi-experimental, or nonexperimental? What specific design was used? Was this a cause-probing study? Given the type of question (Therapy, Prognosis, etc.), was the most rigorous possible design used?
  2. What type of comparison was called for in the research design? Was the comparison strategy effective in illuminating key relationships?
  3. If the study involved an intervention, were the intervention and control conditions adequately described? Was blinding used, and if so, who was blinded? If not, is there a good rationale for failure to use blinding?
  4. If the study was nonexperimental, why did the researcher opt not to intervene? If the study was cause-probing, which criteria for inferring causality were potentially compromised? Was a retrospective or prospective design used, and was such a design appropriate?
  5. Was the study longitudinal or cross-sectional? Was the number and timing of data collection points appropriate?
  6. What did the researcher do to control confounding participant characteristics, and were the procedures effective? What are the threats to the study’s internal validity? Did the design enable the researcher to draw causal inferences about the relationship between the independent variable and the outcome?
  7. What are the major limitations of the design used? Were these limitations acknowledged by the researcher and taken into account in interpreting results? What can be said about the study’s external validity?
  8. Did the report describe an explicit theoretical or conceptual framework for the study? If not, does the absence of a framework detract from the study’s conceptual integration?
  9. Did the report adequately describe the major features of the theory or model so that readers could understand the conceptual basis of the study?
  10. Is the theory or model appropriate for the research problem? Does the purported link between the problem and the framework seem contrived?
  11. Was the theory or model used for generating hypotheses, or is it used as an organizational or interpretive framework? Do the hypotheses (if any) naturally flow from the framework?

University of Central Florida

This assessment method is designed to help you see how logic is used (or misused) in everyday life, and thereby appreciate the importance of good reasoning. You are asked to do some fieldwork related to logic. In particular, you are asked to document an argument “in the wild,” that is, an argument someone makes during a debate, a dispute, or a disagreement as you witness it in everyday life. The argument cannot be taken from a book or an article. You may use various mediums to document this “argument in the wild,” such as text, image, audio, or video. Then you should analyze the argument using the logical tools we learn throughout this course. For the first Argument in the Wild, you should write the argument in canonical form and then evaluate it (that is, determine whether the argument is sound or unsound).

Here is an example of what an “Arguments in the Wild 1” submission should look like:

In this video, Ted Cruz makes the following argument: “…climate change is not science; it’s religion. Look at the language where they call you a denier. ‘Denier’ is not the language of science.”

Senator Cruz’s argument in this video can be reconstructed in canonical form as follows:

P1: Scientists who use religious language are not doing science.

P2: Climatologists (or “global warming alarmists” in Cruz’s words) use religious language (e.g., the term ‘denier’).

Therefore,

C: Climatologists are not doing science. (In other words, “climate change is not science.”)

Reconstructed in this way, Cruz’s argument is valid; that is, if P1 and P2 are true, then C would have to be true as well. The question, then, is whether the premises are in fact true. Is the argument sound? It is not clear that P1 and P2 are actually true. As far as P1 is concerned, scientists use what might be characterized as “religious language” all the time. For example, cosmologists and astrophysicists talk about creation when they talk about the origin of the universe and the Big Bang. Does that mean that cosmology and astrophysics are not science?

As far as P2 is concerned, the term ‘denier’ is not necessarily a “religious” term. In a court of law, for instance, a defendant might say that s/he denies the charges pressed against him/her. Does that mean that one is using “religious language”?

Since there are doubts about whether P1 and P2 are in fact true, although Cruz’s argument can be reconstructed as a valid argument, it cannot be said to be sound.

This, then, is how your first “Arguments in the Wild” assignment should look like. That is, you should use the tools of informal logic (in particular, canonical form) to analyze an argument in the wild. You should determine whether the argument is valid or invalid. If valid, you should determine whether the argument is sound or unsound.

Please submit your work on the due date before class. In class, you will be asked to share your “argument in the wild” with the class.

University of Central Florida

Engagement and participation are important aspects of any college course. For this online course your engagement and participation are partly determined by your presence on the Discussion Boards.

Every student should make at least one original contextual analysis post and two comments to other students’ posts for each module. Posts should be in full, grammatically correct sentences that create at least one solid response of at least 600 words–make sure you include a word count. The 600 word count does NOT include any headers or references section. All posts must be relevant to the assigned materials (although you may build upon previous knowledge from earlier weeks and include personal observations). Start by answering the prompt, and then build upon the prompt to consider your own perspectives and experiences. You MUST attach photos and web links to support your position. An important part of your grade for this assignment is to communicate with your classmates. Because this is intended to be your opportunity to discuss topics with your classmates, the professor/TA will generally refrain from commenting or actively participating in the discussions aside from reading and grading them.

Each of the two comments should be at least 200 words (include a word count) on two different classmates’ posts each module to receive full credit.

Posts: For this post, select one work of art (two-dimensional or three-dimensional art) has NOT been already analyzed or extensively discussed in the course readings or videos…part of the fun in learning about art is in DISCOVERING it! You are required to make one post. In a narrative format, the post should contain the following elements:

  • Define and Identify: Brief information about the artist and work. For example, birth/death dates, place of birth or work, where work is displayed, name of work, medium of work, context for creation of work.
  • Experience and Appreciation: For example, where you found the work (website, another book, museum), what made you select the work, what about this work speaks to you.
  • Observe and Analyze: Use and underline three terms that were introduced in the module to observe/analyze your chosen work. Add any other relevant information to improve your paper.
  • Critique and Compare: Compare your work to similar pieces or to examples used in the module. Consider the impact of the work on a particular social angle and/or the evolution of the media. Consider the impact of experiencing the work on your general outlook on the medium or appreciation of art.
  • Apply Social Angles AND Context: Identify at least one social angle from the list below that can be observed or analyzed as part of the work. Address how the social angle is connected to the work. Plus, a thorough contextual analysis of the historical, cultural, and social implications should be discussed.
    • race and ethnicity,
    • gender and sexuality,
    • class and highbrow/low,
    • colonialism, postcolonialism, place and regionalism,
    • nature (environment, ecology) and culture,
    • memory, history, generational identity,
    • food culture, and
    • body and mind

Students will be expected to define, identify, and apply at least three terms (underline them so I can quickly find them) from the module in the post. Make sure to underline the terms so that I can quickly identify them. College-level writing and mechanics are expected; however, the purpose of this assignment is to move from experiencing art to analyzing art to evaluating art. Make sure to include a references section at the end of every post, even if you only cite the lecture video. All in-text citations and references should be in MLA.

Comments: For each of the two comments, select a classmate’s post, read the post, critique the post, indicate your reaction to the chosen work, discuss a comparison work from the module or any other outside source that is similar to the work identified in the post, and either add personal commentary or pose a question to stimulate conversation.

Here is an example.

University of Central Florida

I will attach the required clips or information on each area which will be to get you thinking about the topic. Some of these will be positive; others negative. It will be your responsibility to find an additional website, clip, or source, research the topic, and write a full 1 page paper about each topic using what you found as well as the required clips or PowerPoints that was sent to you on the topics. Try to expand your beliefs by being open-minded to the subject. (I have provided the required material… please find an additional website, clip, or source for each topic.) 1 page on each topic = 5 pages total.

1. Class/Poverty – By Definition, Social Class are a group of people inside a society who poseses the same or similar socioeconomic status. Usually grouped by income, wealth, education, power, and prestige in society. By definition, Poverty is when a families income fails to meet a federally established threshold. 

YouTube clips 

Youtube video:  Impacts of social class:  Crash course Sociology #25 

https://youtu.be/0a21mndoORE

Youtube video: 20/20 Diane Sawyer  My Reality: a hidden America

Youtube video:  Why is there still poverty in America?/ The Economist

2. Race/EthnicityRace– A person’s physical characteristics, such as: bone structure and skin, hair, or eye color. Refers to the concept of dividing people into populations or groups on the basis of various physical characteristics, usually results from genetic ancestry. Ethnicity– Refers to a person’s cultural factors that include nationality, regional culture, ancestry, and language. Members usually identify with each other on the basis of common nationality or cultural traditions

3. Religion – By definition, religion is a set of beliefs concerning the cause, nature, and purpose of the universe, especially when considered as the creation of a superhuman agency or agencies, usually involving devotional and ritual observances, and often containing a moral code governing the conduct of human affairs. 

4. Old Age/New Generation –

clips

Ted Talk:  Let’s end ageism/ Ashton Applewhite

Ted Talk: Millennials Show Us What “OLD” Looks Like/ Disrupt Aging

5. Gender/Alternate Lifestyles – Gender equality, also known as sexual equality or equality of the sexes, is the state of equal ease of access to resources and opportunities regardless of gender, including economic participation and decision-making; and the state of valuing different behaviors, aspirations and needs equally, regardless of gender. Gender equality is the goal, while gender neutrality and gender equity are practices and ways of thinking that help in achieving the goal. Gender parity, which is used to measure gender balance in a given situation, can aid in achieving gender equality but is not the goal in and of itself. Gender equality is more than equal representation, it is strongly tied to women’s rights, and often requires policy changes. As of 2017, the global movement for gender equality has not incorporated the proposition of genders besides women and men, or gender identities outside of the gender binary.

Lots to think about:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swSy6pdAS-0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qE-vJO67xqg

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gender_equality

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/education/one-year-out-of-college-women-already-paid-less-than-men-report-finds/2012/10/23/ece71cb0-1d3a-11e2-9cd5-b55c38388962_story.html?utm_term=.b5d668f2afd3

Youtube clip:  when did you choose to be straight?

Youtube clip:  Imagine a world where being gay is the norm

Ted Talks:  I’ve lived as a man and woman  Paula Stone Williams

Ted Talks:  Why Gender equality is good for everyone

University of Central Florida

I don’t know how to handle this Nursing question and need guidance.

  1. Unit 4 Discussion

    We are going to switch things up a bit! Read the instructions carefully!!! Every student will have submitted an SBAR for the following cases listed below.

    • Answer the scenarios listed below to address in the Discussion POST.
    • Create a written SBAR report based on the basic patient scenario provided.
      • Imagine you are sending the patient to another provider, or unit, or facility, or clinic. You will need to fill in any information needed for a complete SBAR report.
      • You can be creative, but it must be accurate based on your understanding of problem and subjective and objective assessments. Use the text to help you and ensure accuracy. Use your experience. Use what you learned in this course!
      • You may need to add factors such as gender, age, appropriate vital signs, HPI, significant medical and/or family history, and physical examination outcomes. These are examples, there may be more or less based on the case.
      • Create an SBAR communication that gives a clear picture of the patient and their current status to the receiving provider.
    • Include APA 7th edition format citations and references for any resources that were used.
    • POST SBAR to the Discussion .
  2. ***Patient A.B. is a teen with scoliosis who has come with their mother to the ED. A.B complains of back pain from “sitting long hours”. You have provided care for A.B. and reporting to the oncoming nurse. Be sure to include your musculoskeletal assessment for this complaint. Consider the age related factors for assessing a teen client in your SBAR communication.
  3. ***The “Be Creative Option! Create your own patient, complaint, history, and assessment scenario. You may start by choosing a chief complaint related to any body system and condition. Draw on all you know. Build your patient, the CC, HPI, the medical and significant family history, the significant subjective and objective assessments and then communicate your findings in an SBAR format. Don’t hold back!

University of Central Florida

– Stress Management: https://youtu.be/r_wY0dsoOR4

– Goal Setting and Delegation: https://youtu.be/D4TpCXBBGtg

– Delivering Constructive Feedback: https://youtu.be/gNHGQeZc5X4


Here are your discussion questions for this week’s Textbook Reflection assignment. We are going to focus on four skills. Keeping your answers limited to six pages will probably be a challenge this week–choose your words wisely. It must be 5-6 pages double spaced. No heading page. APA 7th. You can choose to answer all four questions or choose and select three of them as described below.

Reflection Questions (choose 3 or 4):

1. Perform a personal audit on your methods of stress management. Use the concepts from the book (pp. 304-310) and the supplemental lecture. How well do you do managing your own stress and that of your coworkers?

2. Describe a recent situation where you had to establish/set some work goals and assess how well you did at implementing the basic principles of effective goal setting (e.g., specific and observable, attainable but challenging, developing commitment, providing feedback) described on pp. 470-473.

3. Arrange a situation where you can deliver constructive feedback to someone else. In other words, don’t reflect on a situation that you have recently experienced; rather, go out and provide constructive feedback to someone else as part of this assignment. Even though we are skipping a specific analysis of effective and supportive communication (pp. 290-301), this assignment is actually an exercise in effective and supportive communication. After you have completed your discussion with your selected other person, describe your performance and how well you implemented the principles described on pp. 473-478.

4. Define “delegating” using your own words and describe a situation (1.) where you had work/tasks delegated to you and (2.) where you delegated work/tasks to other people. After you have described those examples, discuss the outcomes that arose as a result of successful completion of the delegated tasks. Did you and your coworkers grow and develop in any specific ways (e.g., trust, respect, professionalism, “involvement,” etc.)? Delegation is described in our book on pp. 490-495.

University of Central Florida

  • Outstanding Biomedical Science Award – awarded to a Biomedical Sciences major (minimum 3.5 overall GPA and 20 hours of chemistry coursework)
  • Phi Lambda Upsilon Award – awarded to any major in the Department (minimum 3.5 overall GPA and 30 hours of chemistry coursework)
  • American Institute of Chemists Award – awarded to any major in the Department (no eligibility requirements)

To be considered for one of the awards, please prepare and submit via Qualtrics the following:

. In 200 words or less, describe your goals for your degree and future career.

  • In 500 words or less, describe your most meaningful or significant experience participating in an extracurricular activity or leadership opportunity related to your degree and career interests.
  • Describe any undergraduate research experience you have had. In what lab(s) did you do undergraduate research and who was your research professor? (There is no word limit for this question)- I have not participated in any research but every interested in any research opportunity so please elaborate more on this idea.
  • Classes I took and labs:
  • CHM 2045 General Chemistry I
  • CHM 2045L General Chemistry I Laboratory
  • CHM 2046 General Chemistry II
  • CHM 2046L General Chemistry II Laboratory
  • CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry I
  • CHM 2210L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
  • CHM 2211 Organic Chemistry II
  • CHM 2211L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
  • BCH 3053 General Biochemistry
  • CHM 3610 Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry
  • CHM 3610L Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory·
  • Experience I am involved in:
  • Sports Program Supervisor (Aug 2021- Present)
  • Recreation & Wellness
  • – Maintain a safe environment for all Intramural and Sport Club participants, including players, coaches, spectators, and fellow employees.
  • – Assist with the training and development of officials, including rules presentations, clinic stations, written and video evaluations.
  • – Resolve participant conflicts and disputes in a timely and diplomatic manner
  • – CPR/AED for Professional Rescuers with First Aid·
  • Vice President (April 2020 – Present)
  • Omani Student Association
    – Works beside the president on preparing and planning for upcoming meetings and events
    – Ensures that all members know their duties and are carrying out their tasks as supposed
  • Event Coordinator (May 2019 – April 2020)
    Omani Student Association at USF
    – Organized events for 200+ students
    – Arranged venue reservations and event services
    – Monitored ‘MSC’s Event Planning Team’ approval

University of Central Florida

I’m working on a communications writing question and need support to help me learn.

WE HUMANS

Opinion: Why affordable housing needs to be a right, not a privilege

May 19, 2017 /

Sébastien Thibault

It’s time to ensure that no American has to worry about where they and their families will sleep tonight, says housing consultant James Stockard.

There’s a lot of talk these days about how we can make America great again, with politicians, academics and journalists looking for the answers in areas that include increased defense spending, infrastructure investment and job programs. But after spending nearly 50 years consulting on housing at the local, state and national levels, I believe there’s one cornerstone element of a great nation that is being overlooked: decent, affordable housing. Roughly 19 million households in the US earn incomes that are low enough to qualify for housing assistance, but only 24 percent of them receive support because there simply aren’t enough affordable housing units or vouchers.

The US needs to declare a basic right to affordable housing, and then deliver it to the people. This may seem like a dramatic idea. Then again, so was the notion that women be allowed to vote in 1920, or that African-American children be entitled to go to the same schools as white children in 1954, or that people of the same gender be legally permitted to marry in 2014. When America is at its best, when we are truly great, we’ve shown that we are a nation that continues to expand its citizens’ rights and protect their newly-recognized rights.

It’s fiscally smart. Providing permanent housing is, by far, the least expensive way to provide shelter for those who need it, as shown in a nine-city study from the Lewin Group (and research by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, the National Alliance to End Homelessness and other groups). Without it, people end up in overcrowded apartments, homeless shelters, hospitals, institutions for the mentally or physically disabled, jails or on the street. Each of these alternatives costs taxpayers substantially more than paying for permanent places to live. For example, $10,000 in public funding covers 10+ months of permanent affordable housing — but only 6+ months in a shelter or one week in a hospital.

It’s socially responsible. Over the course of 40 years as a commissioner of my local public housing authority in Massachusetts, I’ve learned that people who struggle with housing frequently have little time to do anything else. They’re constantly worrying about how to cover the rent, or where they’ll sleep, or what they can do fight off an impending eviction. I’ve heard hundreds of stories from desperate men and women appealing for “emergency admission” because they had lost their job, or were escaping an abusive relationship, or were asked to leave a family member’s home after doubling up with them for six months. (Read Evicted by sociology professor Matthew Desmond for gut-wrenching stories of housing instability in Milwaukee.) As a result, people without stable housing have little time or energy to contribute to their communities.

It gives children a good start in life. The typical child in a family without permanent housing changes schools three or more times a year, according to the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty. This means every year they must adjust to three (or more) different teachers, curriculums, school cultures, and groups of classmates. What are the chances that a child will flourish under these circumstances? Some will succeed despite the odds, but most won’t.

A right to housing is a given in much of the rest of the world. It was part of the Universal Declaration on Human Rights, an international commitment that was adopted by the United Nations in 1948 and signed by 130 nations (including the US). South Africa and more than 50 other nations state a person’s right to housing in their constitutions. Most European countries affirm this principle, either in writing or in practice.

Recently, I spent six months in Scotland studying their housing programs and spoke to more than 50 government officials, nonprofit developers, community advocates and academic experts. With each person, I asked: “Is there an assumption in Scotland that it is a civic responsibility to make sure every person has a decent, affordable place to live?” Their answer was always some variation on “Well, yes, of course” — many of them were puzzled that I’d even had to ask. Backing up that assumed responsibility for housing, the government of Scotland committed three billion pounds, about $3.8 billion, in 2016 to build 50,000 new affordable homes over the next five years, a significant investment for a country with a population of 5.4 million, or about 1.7 percent of America’s.

Meeting the goal of an affordable place to live for every American faces two primary roadblocks: money and regulation. Right now, “affordable housing” allocations make up about 1.1 percent of the national budget, or $41.8 billion, and serve about one-quarter of the people who need assistance. So quadrupling that amount in order to cover everyone would bring it up to 4.4 percent, or $168 billion. This may seem like a large amount — but not when you consider that the US government already spends roughly $150 billion a year on the mortgage interest deduction clause in its tax code, which subsidizes homeownership for its wealthier citizens. The regulatory issues are trickier, because zoning and other local rules are often used to prevent the construction of affordable homes. In addition, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) governs the housing industry, and in my decades of experience, it can be a nightmare for developers in towns and cities. Local politicians also face challenges in approving affordable housing developments when residents complain — out of fear and ignorance — that their property values will suffer. The NIMBYs usually win.

We need to come up with creative solutions to zoning problems. In Massachusetts, for example, the state’s Chapter 40B legislation allows developers of affordable housing to apply for exceptions to local zoning laws if ten percent of the community housing stock doesn’t already consist of affordable housing units. If the municipality rejects the application, the developer can appeal to a state board. The state board has overridden local zoning laws in 95 percent of the cases brought before it in the past 48 years, resulting in the construction of over 50,000 affordable homes. While the process is very slow and each development must be reviewed by many people at the local and state levels, complexes have eventually been built. Perhaps it’s time for a national Chapter 40B?

Americans are fortunate enough to live in one of the wealthiest countries on the planet; it’s time to commit to the principle that all of the nation’s citizens have the right to a decent home that is within their means. It’s one national investment from which we’ll all reap the dividends. My friend Clorae was a single parent with nine children, and she was lucky to find a home in public housing. Today those nine kids include a doctor, a professor, two schoolteachers and a local HUD official. Thanks in part to having a permanent, affordable home, Clorae was available to help her kids reach their full potential. Don’t we all want to live in a nation that assures the Cloraes among us have the opportunity to nurture these kinds of future citizens? Surely the hallmark of any great nation should be one in which no one — no elderly person, no person with a disability or chronic illness, no newly naturalized American, no person working full-time at a minimum wage job, and certainly no child — should wonder where they’ll sleep tonight.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

James Stockard has worked as a consultant with nonprofit groups and public agencies across the country on affordable housing and community development. He was the curator of the Loeb Fellowship at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design for 17 years.

If you respond to the Housing article please reply to the following:

  1. Do you agree/disagree (and why) with the author of the article that “The US needs to declare a basic right to affordable housing, and then deliver it to the people.”
  2. What knowledge and or experience do you have regarding housing and housing affordability?
  3. Is any of what the author suggested realistic or just “pie in the sky socialistic” rhetoric?

University of Central Florida

assignment-icons-content.png PROJECT

Project Goals

Create appropriate visuals from numeric data

Analyze visuals to support a specific point or argument

Apply principles of design to create a visually appealing, readable document

Write using a professional style that emphasizes clarity, concision, and accuracy.

Download Rubric Download Download Rubric

What Will You Produce?

  • Be sure to review the project instructions thoroughly before submitting your work…
  • By the end of Project 2 I’m expecting to see a 1-2 page (1 page front and back) visually attractive report featuring three data visualizations you have created. The data sets needed to make these visualizations has been given to you in the project instructions below. Your visual report should also have a clear written argument of your own, one that uses your three data visualizations as pieces of evidence to make a larger point. The balance of textual and visual information is a tough one for a short report like this, but please make sure all information is clear and easy to read/understand. 
  • Description
  • This project asks you to engage with data, present data for a specific audience (your classmates), and practice making effective data visualizations. The project focuses on 

the fair, accurate, and ethical use of data

the conventions of writing with numbers and data

how to integrate figures into a document

how to design effective visualizations. 

As you will learn in completing this project, numbers don’t speak for themselves, and writing with data requires critical and rhetorical thought, as well as visual design skills.

In working on this project, you will engage with different types of visuals, as well as the conventions of writing with data and numbers. To achieve these goals, you will select one of the data sets listed below. After reviewing the data set you select, you will decide on a point you want to make using the data in your data set. Then, since you can’t visualize all the data in your data set, you will make decisions about which data to visualize. Using the data you have selected, you will create three data visualizations help you make your point. Then you will write about and analyze that data in a brief visual report. The final visual report you create will include the three visuals you have made, and the supporting text necessary to explain the data you have visualized and make your point. 

In addition to the visual report, you also will create a second deliverable. You will compose a reflective memo that explains your choices and goals, and how the visual report deliverable achieves them.

Use your the textbook chapter on Visual Design to help you design and write about your visuals. Additionally, you may wish to use this Periodic Table of Visualization Methods (Links to an external site.) to explore various types and uses of visuals or consult this article from Tableu: What is a Data Visualization? (Links to an external site.)

Data visualizations bring a number of benefits to any professional document, even short ones:

Though they have become extremely easy to make, people in the workplace still tend to be impressed by the extra effort and thoughtful presentation implicit in making a visualization.

Data visualizations also help to make the work of digesting and interpreting data more efficient by displaying trends or illustrating the significance of specific information without poring over page after page of numbers.

Because of this efficiency, visual elements are also better at communicating certain ideas more quickly than words or tabular data. Something that may take many sentences to communicate, a sudden drop in the efficiency of a process, or a surge in sales among a certain demographic, are instantly recognizable as spikes or dips along the X axis of a line graph.

As previously mentioned, numbers don’t speak for themselves. Integrating visuals comes with all the benefits listed above, but using visuals also comes with responsibility to use visuals fairly and justly. Visuals reduce people to numbers, to data, and then, by making a visual using some data but not other data, you make some people more significant than others. Your visuals represent a choice to emphasize some facts, and, in so doing, deemphasize others. Your visuals must be complete and accurate, but also fair and just. When you create your visuals, you should start with questions such as, “Am I representing the data accurately?” and also, “Am I representing the data fully and in a way that does no harm to certain groups?”

In your visual report, you will create three visualizations and integrate them into your report, providing an introduction to the topic and analysis of the data you include to make a point about the topic using your data.

Assignment

For this project, you will select a data set from the ones listed below and create a short informational report that includes at least three data visualizations that you create. In your visuals, you will communicate the data you select from your data set in a form that maximizes the impact of the data. Your report should be designed for an audience of your classmates and an informative purpose.

To create your visualizations and informational report, select one of the following data sets:

Want to find a data set of your own? Check out the RCMD (Links to an external site.)

Once you have selected a data set, spend some time with the data. Identify the trends that jump out at you as most significant. Your audience is your classmates, so think about what you want them to know and how best to visualize the data for them. You will not be able to visualize or discuss all the data in your data set. Your job is to select and visualize the data that is most relevant to your audience and the point you are making.

assignment-icons-content.png EXERCISE

Once you have selected the data set you want to work with and decided on a point you want to make using that data, submit the following:

A brief description of your data set and some of its major findings 

Three specific data points you found interesting from your set

A description of the relationship between these data points and what they might mean for certain audiences

A argument for why your audience of fellow college students should find this data interesting/important

  • Next steps: Project 2

After submitting this information, you can begin to design your three data visualizations for Project 2. Just like you are practicing using data points as evidence for an argument in this assignment, Project 2 asks you to use more visually appealing graphics for this purpose in the context of a short report.

  • Remember: your data visualizations are a major component of the project, but they must support and be supported by professional, concise, body text. Think about the data visualizations as the three major points that you want someone to remember from your short report–they are such important points that you added color and symbols and all sorts of eye-catching goodness to them to make sure everyone sees. 

To help you with some of that designy stuff, I’m going to dump a bunch of short videos and resources here for you to refer back to as you continue to work on Project 2. 

Typography Basics Video (Links to an external site.)

Understanding Color Video (Links to an external site.)

Layout and Composition Video (Links to an external site.)

Graphic Design: Images Video

University of Central Florida

Global Music and Jazz

Jazz Music is an original American art form that incorporates music from many different cultures. It has become an international music, which can be heard in most countries around the world, performed by musicians from those countries as well as American musicians. This assignment is a research and writing assignment that asks you to write about a contemporary International Jazz musician/group (a musician or group that comes from a country other than the USA) or an International jazz “scene” such as a famous International jazz festival like the Umbria Jazz Festival in Italy, or the jazz scene found in an international metropolitan area such as Paris, London, Cape Town or Tokyo – writing about how Jazz has become part of the “scene” in those places – important venues: jazz clubs, concert houses, jazz societies, and important musicians from the “scene”. This paper is to be about the current Jazz scene or artist/group, you need to document Jazz music that is going on NOW, within the last 5 years. Your paper can discuss important background issues to support your ideas, but your subject is an International Jazz artist of scene that is currently active.

There are many interesting topics that fall under this umbrella. Many international jazz musicians combine music from their own country or region with existing jazz musical ideas to create a new jazz sound. Other international jazz musicians are dedicated to playing very traditional styles of jazz. Many came to the US to study jazz music and apprentice with American jazz masters.If you choose to write about an artist/group, you will need to find artists/groups that are living and practicing the music in an International location. Some will still perform I the US, (and around the world) while basing their careers outside the US, often in their home countries or regions.

It is important that the topic you choose has enough information about the international aspects of the musician/group or jazz scene to support a research paper. The assignment is about a “contemporary” artist or scene – meaning that the artists or scene is currently active, with the paper including recent activity – recordings, concerts, etc.. Historical background is important, but the focus of the paper is about an artist/jazz scene going on right now.

For instance, if you write about the jazz scene in Paris, you need to mention the history of Jazz in Paris (this is very important to this topic) and then write about the scene today, where the musicians are playing Jazz in Paris, who they are and how Jazz is integrated into modern Parisian society.

The USF Library has created a Course Guide for this class with useful information on how to conduct online searches and what materials are available in the USF Library that could be useful to this assignment.

http://guides.lib.usf.edu/SurveyJazz (Links to an external site.) (Links to an external site.)

Requirements:

  1. Write a 1000-1500 word paper (this is the body of the paper, not including the discography and references, etc..)

NOTE: word count is the least important part of the grading of this paper. Any paper that covers all of the requirements will be at least 1000 words, this is just a suggestion so that you don’t feel like you have to write a LONG paper. The content, quality of writing, inclusion of required information and following the writing style guidelines are the most important part of this paper. The paper should be well written, following general rules and formatting for a Research Paper in MLA or APA format. You can get help and information about writing a Research Paper from the USF Writing Center.

  1. Research your topic well. It is important that you find lots of good information to base your paper on.
  2. Find and listen to musical examples of the artist(s)/group(s) you are writing about. If you are writing about a jazz “scene”, find and listen to some of the important artists from that scene. Find reviews of their music, and include your own description of what you hear in the music.
  3. If you are writing about an artist/group, Include a general description of the artist/group, what they are known for and other relevant projects/recordings they have produced. Include a selected discography as part of your reference citations.
  1. A discography is a list of important recordings by the artist or group. (You can find examples of discographies online.) You need to include the artist/group name, title of the recording, record label (company), year it was released, and important personnel on the recording.
  1. Include information about the recordings you write about:
    1. Date released
    2. Record label
    3. Musicians on the recording
    4. How readers can find this music (purchase, listen, etc)

You will be graded on:

  1. The inclusion of all of the issues listed above in your paper.
  2. Evidence of research into the artist/group or jazz scene and the music associated with your topic. References to your other research should be included.
  3. How well written and readable the paper is.
    1. This is an IMPORTANT part of the Draft-Final paper process, to create a Final Paper that is well written and interesting to the reader.

Basic format:

Opening Paragraph (Thesis)

– describes the content of the paper and the points to be made.

Inside Paragraphs

– discuss each topic presented in the Opening Paragraph (Thesis)

Conclusion

Research References

– citations need to be in MLA or APA format

Discography

– A discography is similar to a bibliography, the only difference being that it comprises a list of audio or sound recordings that you have cited in your paper. Sound recordings come in a variety of formats such as LP, cassette, CD, MP3, and even audio recordings streamed from the Web. If you refer to sound recordings in your paper, you will need to create a separate section on a new page entitled “Discography.” A “Selected Discography” includes important recordings by the artist or group you are writing about.

A Song or Album – Music can be cited multiple ways. Mainly, this depends on the container that you accessed the music from. Generally, citations begin with the artist name. They might also be listed by composers or performers. Otherwise, list composer and performer information after the album title. Put individual song titles in quotation marks. Album names are italicized. Provide the name of the recording manufacturer followed by the publication date.

If information such as record label or name of album is unavailable from your source, do not list that information.

Spotify – Rae Morris. “Skin.” Cold, Atlantic Records, 2014. Spotify, open.spotify.com/track/0OPES3Tw5r86O6fudK8gxi.

Online Album –Beyoncé. “Pray You Catch Me.” Lemonade, Parkwood Entertainment, 2016, www.beyonce.com/album/lemonade-visual-album/ (Links to an external site.).

CD – Nirvana. “Smells Like Teen Spirit.” Nevermind, Geffen, 1991.

University of Central Florida

Chapter 7 Discussion Post (extra credit)

This discussion post is optional but if you create an original post AND comment on someone else’s post in a constructive and reflective manner, you can earn 2 points extra credit per module discussion post. Posts are due by 2 p.m. Wednesday each week. Please use full sentences and proper grammar and punctuation. You cannot post in later weeks to this discussion hoping to earn extra credit.

For this module, reflect on the following:

How do you decide to see a movie in the theater? Do you wait to see certain types of movies at home, and if so, what type are they? Does the availability of blu-ray movies or streaming services such as Netflix, or the availability of some first-run movies on HBO Max or Amazon Prime, affect your decisions about what to watch in the theater and what to watch at home?

reply to her:

My criteria for seeing a movie in the theater is is it a big action movie with lots of stunts, is it a movie I’ve wanted to see for a while, or is it just a cute movie I want to see before it comes out on DVD. Going to an actual movie theater is a great experience when it comes to watching a good movie for the first time. I’m taking about everything from the movie theater bought popcorn, to lounging back in a comfy chair, to knowing the whole theater is experiencing the movie with you. So when a great movie pops up I love going and experiencing it in a theater. If the upcoming movie seems good, but not great I will wait for it to leave the theater to watch it, because it is not worth paying money to go see. If I can see a new movie for free on HBO MAX for example I am probably going to watch it on that. As much as I like to see action movies in theaters because of the experience with the surround sound I am more likely to watch it at home if I have the opportunity, like I had when Wonder Women: 1984 came out for a limited time on HBO MAX. This is because of saving money and comfort that comes from seeing movies at home. 

University of Central Florida

Hello, please read the instructions carefully

Chapter 6: Visual Design

Chapter 6 focuses on the “D” (for Design) in PAD. The section you are reading discusses the visualizations used in PTC documents. Topics include creating visuals and types of visuals.

Joanna Wolfe Presentation: Narrative Numbers

Watch the following presentation before completing the exercise below–no need to stick around for the Q&A. Think through the points made in this presentation as well as in your textbook as you work to create your own, simple, data-visualization.

assignment-icons-content.png EXERCISE

Instructions

This exercises asks to you collect data and create a data visualization that communicates that data graphically.

Step 1 – Collect Data

At home, or wherever you are working, collect a set of quantitative (numerical) data. While everybody loves a good pie chart, try to collect a different data than just “how many” of a thing to make your visuals more interesting and of different types. For example:

  • How long does it take to get to a specific floor in the elevator vs. climbing the stairs based on multiple tries?
  • What’s the ratio of books to other stuff on your shelves?
  • How much time do ducks spend foraging vs. just wandering around?

Think about the various processes that take time or require resources (e.g., how many almonds you eat in an hour, or the average time it takes to drink a soda). Think about the items you have around you and what they are used for (e.g., what apps do you check on your phone in an hour). Quantitative data is all around you–every time you do something, check something, or observe something, you are generating data. And so are the things around you–e.g., stoplights, phones, dogs, and squirrels. Select an item or items around you (including yourself) and collect the data it generates.

Step 2 – Create a Visualization

Once you have your data, draw a data visualization that represents your data. To pick the type of data visualization, go back to the Design chapter you read and review the visualization types. You can use any medium you want to create your visualization–pens, crayons, markers, or, if you are already familiar with creating visualizations digitally, use an app like Canva (Links to an external site.).

Step 3 – Share your Visualization and Comment

If you draw your visualization, you can submit a picture taken with your phone to the below. Include your name in the title. When you share your visualization, answer the following questions about it, along with the image:

What does the data visualization show?
Why did you pick that visualization format?

Step 4 – Review and Comment

After sharing your work, use the Reply button below to comment on at least two of your peers’ visualizations, addressing the following:

  • Is it clear what the visualization represents?
  • Is the type of visual appropriate for the data? Can you think of other types of visuals that might be useful?
  • Does the design and color use make the visual easy to read?

University of Central Florida

Complete this project part by doing the following things

The Job Targeted is working as “Financial Analysts”

Completely answer all parts of the question (What do you want to do? Why do you want to do that?)

Minimum one page, maximum two pages; single spaced

Read “A Summer’s Day” by Mary Oliver @@@ATTACHED@@@

Compose an essay that answers the question, “Tell me, what is it you plan to do?” Your essay should address the following:

  • Explain the things you’ll do to secure a job, a promotion, or start your own business (be employed at graduation)
  • Based on your research and networking, explain why the sources and tasks you’ve chosen are the best things to do to reach your career goal. CHOSEN SOURCES ARE “career fairs, social media, internet such as linked inn, etc…”
  • Reflect on how the activity that you chose to do this semester helped you begin to execute your Career action Plan and move closer to your ultimate career goal.

To compose an essay that can not only serve you in your other career classes but support your career pursuits, consider the following points:

  • There is no right answer for what you want to do or how you want to get a job doing it, so your answer to that question will not be evaluated. What will be evaluated is whether you state specific actions and the data and information you use to support your answer;
  • Business professionals do not develop action plans based on gut feelings or emotions. Your decisions and support should be based on facts drawn from careful research and analysis. Please support your argument with objective information based on your evaluation of all potential sources (Ex, if your GPA is not high enough for you to get into grad school, you probably won’t meet the educational requirements to sit for the CPA exam)
  • Your essay should also focus particular attention on actions that you will take while you are in school;
  • Your essay should be “action-oriented” rather than philosophical. You can weave personal experiences and social commentary into your essay, but you must support your position with a plan of action;
  • Don’t talk about what you “think,” focus on what you “know” and what you will “do;”

University of Central Florida

This assessment method is designed to help you see how logic is used (or misused) in everyday life, and thereby appreciate the importance of good reasoning. You are asked to do some fieldwork related to logic. In particular, you are asked to document an argument “in the wild,” that is, an argument someone makes during a debate, a dispute, or a disagreement as you witness it in everyday life. The argument cannot be taken from a book or an article. You may use various mediums to document this “argument in the wild,” such as text, image, audio, or video. Then you should analyze the argument using the logical tools we learn throughout this course. For the second Argument in the Wild, you should write the argument in canonical form and then evaluate it, that is, determine whether the argument is valid or invalid, using a Venn diagram. If the argument is valid, determine whether it is sound or unsound.

Here is an example of what an “Arguments in the Wild 2” submission should look like:

In this video, Trevor Noah discusses the following argument, which is made by the CEO of CBS, Les Moonves: “The money’s rolling in… This is going to be a very good year for us. Sorry, it’s a terrible thing to say, but, bring it on, Donald.”

Moonves’ argument in this video can be reconstructed in canonical form as follows:

P1: Anything that brings in money is good for CBS.

P2: Trump’s presidential bid brings in money.

Therefore,

C: Trump’s presidential bid is good for CBS.

Reconstructed in this way, Moonves’ argument is valid; that is, if P1 and P2 are true, then C would have to be true as well. Indeed, the argument is an AAA-1 categorical syllogism.

S: Things identical with Trump’s presidential bid

P: Things that are good for CBS

M: Things that bring in money

All M are P.

All S are M.

All S are P.

AAA-1.gif

Since the argument is valid, the question is whether the premises are in fact true. Is the argument sound? If the only thing that CBS cares about is the bottom line, then it would follow that Trump’s presidential bid is good for CBS, given that it is good for CBS’s bottom line. However, it might be argued that CBS, as a major source of news, has a journalistic responsibility to the American public. If the American public loses trust in CBS, upon finding out that CBS reports only the news that bring in money, then that could also hurt CBS’s bottom line.

Since there are doubts about whether the premises are true, although Moonves’ argument can be reconstructed as a valid categorical syllogism, it cannot be said to be sound.

This, then, is how your second “Arguments in the Wild” assignment should look like. That is, you should use the tools of Categorical Logic (in particular, Venn diagrams) to analyze one argument in the wild. You should determine whether the argument is valid or invalid by means of a Venn diagram. If valid, you should determine whether the argument is sound or unsound.

University of Central Florida

Choose ONE of the following characters from The Great Gatsby:

Daisy

Tom

Gatsby

Nick

Jordan

Myrtle

Describe the key characteristics of the character. What is their personality like? What are their values? What are some important actions we associate with them in the novel? Then choose a key quote that is either about that character or said by the character. Give the full quote (and note which chapter it appears in) and give your brief analysis of that quote. What does it tell us about the character?

Post 1

Hi Everyone,

Jay Gatsby is the novel’s center of attention in a weird way. This is despite that the novel is not narrated from his perspective. On top of that, Gatsby’s emergence into the novel was not only slow, but much of his introduction did not physically involve him altogether. Early on in the book, most of the information we learn about Gatsby is through Nick Carraway’s indirect accounts and Jordan Baker mentioning him at dinner. The novel’s slow physical inclusion of Gatsby plays hand-in-hand with his mysterious personality. Gatsby’s mysterious personality is more secondary because his main characteristic is that he calls everybody “old sport.” In my opinion, Gatsby’s most important action is his parties, which we learned were to lure in Daisy Buchanan as part of his quest to reclaim his lost love.

Gatsby’s mysterious personality and unimaginable wealth have an unintended consequence on how others perceive him. This resulted in gossiping and various rumors. For example, when a partygoer asserted, “You look at him sometimes when he thinks nobody’s looking at him. I’ll bet he killed a man” (Fitzgerald 44). This quote shows that Gatsby’s strange and elusive private life opens the door for any unsubstantiated claims. Gatsby was also dishonest about his personal life, not only the partygoers who gossiped about him; take page 65 as an example. Gatsby told Nick he is the son of wealthy people in the Middle West. When Nick asked where in the Middle West, I had to laugh out loud when Gatsby said San Francisco (San Francisco is on the West Coast, not the Middle West). It is not until chapter 6 when Nick tells us about Gatsby’s early life, showing that neither the gossiping partygoers’ nor Gatsby’s claims were true. In addition to that, it was relatively easy to tell that Gatsby was being dishonest when telling Nick about his early life; he was having a hard time telling the “story” (Fitzgerald 65). Both the partygoer’s gossip and Gatsby’s own account tell us that Gatsby is not only mysterious but also flagrantly dishonest.

University of Central Florida

I’m trying to study for my Statistics course and I need some help to understand this question.

i need you to find an article that uses statistics and write a paragraph summary describing how statistics is used in the article.

1. Data Collection

1.1 Introduction to the Practice of Statistics

1.2 Observational Studies versus Designed Experiments

1.3 Simple Random Sampling

1.4 Other Effective Sampling Methods

1.5 Bias in Sampling

1.6 The Design of Experiments

Chapter 1 Review

Chapter Test

Making an Informed Decision: What College Should I Attend?

Case Study: Chrysalises for Cash

II. DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS

2. Organizing and Summarizing Data

2.1 Organizing Qualitative Data

2.2 Organizing Quantitative Data: The Popular Displays

2.3 Additional Displays of Quantitative Data

2.4 Graphical Misrepresentations of Data

Chapter 2 Review

Chapter Test

Making an Informed Decision: Tables or Graphs?

Case Study: The Day the Sky Roared

3. Numerically Summarizing Data

3.1 Measures of Central Tendency

3.2 Measures of Dispersion

3.3 Measures of Central Tendency and Dispersion from Grouped Data

3.4 Measures of Position and Outliers

3.5 The Five-Number Summary and Boxplots

Chapter 3 Review

Chapter Test

Making an Informed Decision: What Car Should I Buy?

Case Study: Who Was “A Mourner”?

4. Describing the Relation between Two Variables

4.1 Scatter Diagrams and Correlation

4.2 Least-Squares Regression

4.3 Diagnostics on the Least-Squares Regression Line

4.4 Contingency Tables and Association

4.5 Nonlinear Regression: Transformations (online)

Chapter 4 Review

Chapter Test

Making an Informed Decision: Relationships among Variables on a World Scale

Case Study: Thomas Malthus, Population, and Subsistence

III. PROBABILITY AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS

5. Probability

5.1 Probability Rules

5.2 The Addition Rule and Complements

5.3 Independence and the Multiplication Rule

5.4 Conditional Probability and the General Multiplication Rule

5.5 Counting Techniques

5.6 Simulating Probability Experiments

5.7 Putting It Together: Which Method Do I Use?

5.8 Bayes’s Rule (online)

Chapter 5 Review

Chapter Test

Making an Informed Decision: The Effects of Drinking and Driving

Case Study: The Case of the Body in the Bag

6. Discrete Probability Distributions

6.1 Discrete Random Variables

6.2 The Binomial Probability Distribution

6.3 The Poisson Probability Distribution

6.4 The Hypergeometric Probability Distribution (online)

6.5 Combining Random Variables (online)

Chapter 6 Review

Chapter Test

Making an Informed Decision: Should We Convict?

Case Study: The Voyage of the St. Andrew

7. The Normal Probability Distribution

7.1 Properties of the Normal Distribution

7.2 Applications of the Normal Distribution

7.3 Assessing Normality

7.4 The Normal Approximation to the Binomial Probability Distribution 

University of Central Florida

This assessment method is designed to help you see how logic is used (or misused) in everyday life, and thereby appreciate the importance of good reasoning. You are asked to do some fieldwork related to logic. In particular, you are asked to document an argument “in the wild,” that is, an argument someone makes during a debate, a dispute, or a disagreement as you witness it in everyday life. The argument cannot be taken from a book or an article. You may use various mediums to document this “argument in the wild,” such as text, image, audio, or video. Then you should analyze the argument using the logical tools we learn throughout this course. For the third Argument in the Wild, you should write the argument in canonical form and then evaluate it, that is, determine whether the argument is valid or invalid, using a truth table. If the argument is valid, determine whether it is sound or unsound.

Here is an example of what an “Arguments in the Wild 3” submission should look like:

In this video, Ray Comfort (the person holding the banana) makes the following argument: “…the whole of creation testifies to the genius of God…”

Comfort’s argument in this video can be reconstructed in canonical form as follows:

P1: If nature exhibits design, then it must have been designed by an intelligent being.

P2: Nature exhibits design (e.g., bananas are designed for humans to eat them).

Therefore,

C: Nature must have been designed by an intelligent being (AKA God).

Reconstructed in this way, Comfort’s argument is valid; that is, if P1 and P2 are true, then C would have to be true as well. In particular, it has the following logical form:

???D?I

?D

???I

Where D stands for the sentence “Nature exhibits design,” and I stands for the sentence “Nature must have been designed by an intelligent being.”

This logical form is known as modus ponens, which is valid as the following truth table demonstrates:

P1P2CDID –> IDITTTTTTFFTFFTTFTFFTFF

Since the argument is valid, the question is whether the premises are in fact true. Is the argument sound? If Comfort studied a well-made coconut, as opposed to a well-made banana, he would have concluded that the coconut is not perfectly designed for human consumption. The coconut is difficult to open, hard to chew, and hard to digest. In fact, coconuts even kill people (Links to an external site.). The point, then, is that some things in nature appear to be designed for us and some are not. If we look at the former, we might conclude that there is a God. If we look at the latter, we might conclude that there is no God (or perhaps that there is an evil God who is trying to mess with us).

Since there are doubts about whether the premises are true, although Comfort’s argument can be reconstructed as a valid argument, it cannot be said to be sound.

This, then, is how your third “Arguments in the Wild” assignment should look like. That is, you should use the tools of Sentential Logic (in particular, truth tables) to analyze one argument in the wild. You should determine whether the argument is valid or invalid by means of a truth table. If valid, you should determine whether the argument is sound or unsound.

University of Central Florida

For this assignment, you will interview someone you trust about a close relationship this person had with someone of the opposite sex. This relationship must be a past relationship and must be one that did not end as a result of death. Past girlfriends/boyfriends or friendships are good relationships to assess. You will use the Relationship Interview Form attached to conduct your interview and formulate appropriate questions to ask. Keep in mind that many of the questions and points on the form refer to the textbook, but remember that the person you interviewed has not read the textbook. Therefore, use your research from your readings to re-formulate the questions so that they are appropriate for interviewing your chosen individual. You will need to be caught up in reading and viewing all Reading and Viewing assignments that have been assigned so far in this course to complete this assignment well.

After the interview, use the responses to the questions you asked during the interview to write a 3-4 page paper. Your paper should address all the points on the Relationship Interview Form, include a 2-3 paragraph summary of your experience during the interview, as well as your thoughts and anything learned through this activity.

Write your paper in Microsoft Word and format it according to APA standards. Please review the Guidelines for APA Style.


Relationship Interview Form

1. Describe a past, close relationship with someone of the opposite sex that has since ended.

2. Chapter one of the Looking Out, Looking In textbook provides information about the characteristics of interpersonal relationships: uniqueness, irreplaceability, interdependence, disclosure, intrinsic rewards and scarcity. Talk about how those characteristics were present or absent in this relationship. Give examples.

3. Would you rate the self-concept of the other person in this relationship as high or low? Did that have an impact on this relationship?

4. Did you know much about your partner’s family of origin? Did his/her experiences with them influence your relationship negatively or positively? Give examples.

5. In what way did this person’s values differ from yours? In what ways were they the same? Did this affect the relationship negatively?

6. Chapter three in Parrott’s book addresses gender issues in relationships. Review these with your interviewee, talk about how gender differences, both good, and bad, were apparent in this relationship.

7. Have your interviewee talk about any cultural/social/spiritual differences in his/her relationship that were apparent and/or caused any difficulties in the relationship.

8. In Chapter six of Parrott’s book, they talk about six ways to be smart in our love relationship decisions. Go over these six ways with your interviewee and discuss how these played out in this past relationship.

9. Chapter eight of Parrott’s book talks about breaking up and ways to cope effectively with the break up. Talk to your interviewee about the end of his/her relationship—how the decision was made and how he or she coped with the loss afterwards.

University of Central Florida

For this assignment, you will complete an activity designed to help you create a Personal Values Statement for yourself. Complete the Personal Values ChecklistPersonal Values Checklist – Alternative Formats activity.

(Adapted from Checklist for Personal Values by C. Roberts, Fifth Discipline Fieldbook)

Values are qualities that are considered worthwhile. They are our highest priorities and deeply held beliefs and driving forces. Often our values are so deeply ingrained in our subconscious that we no longer recognize when our decisions are guided by values. Our values can help us make decisions that keep us on a chosen path in life.

When values are not clearly defined, we can be easily drawn in unhealthy directions. For example, if a person was raised in a family that highly valued sexual purity, but did not clearly define that value in him/herself, it will be very easy for that person to be led into a relationship that does not respect sexual purity. If a company does not define its values, it might be drawn into business decisions (such as utilizing sweat shops overseas to save money) that can eventually hurt the business.

Strongly held values can help us make relationship decisions. They assist us in choosing relationships that help us maintain our own values. For example, it could be difficult for someone who highly values healthy living to spend quite a bit of time with a couch potato addicted to potato chips and video games without eventually compromising his/her own values. However, we must be careful not to judge others with differing values. While we might respect the individual who highly values exercise and good nutrition, our couch potato who highly values enjoying relaxation, entertainment, fun and good food may deserve a measure of respect as well. Many Christian values are not clearly set forth for us, leaving us the freedom to decide for ourselves what value priorities best serve our walk with Christ. What we must be cautious of, in our relationships with others, is too quickly judging and rejecting those who do not share our personal Christian values.

I have a friend who is a vegetarian. This is a very strongly held value of hers. She proudly announces it on a bumper sticker; she talks about it in conversation and reads about it incessantly. She likes to share about her life-changing experience that led to this strong conviction. I, on the other hand, am about the furthest thing from a vegetarian. I was born and raised on a Midwest farm, love a nice, pink, juicy steak, and just simply try never to think about those poor chickens that live in small cages so that I can enjoy that great chicken fettuccini for supper. We hold very different values in this area, my friend and I, but because we respect each other’s values, we do not judge the other, or treat them poorly, because of our differing values.

On the other hand, I have an acquaintance who highly values homeschooling. She takes great pride in staying home with her children and educating them in her home. While I can respect these values and I respect her decision to do so, I myself take great pride in my career and feel strongly that my children will benefit from a public education and the social and educational opportunities it offers them. Notice that I did not state that this person was a friend of mine! This person chooses to try and “impose” her values on me when we are together and makes it very clear to me that my choices are “wrong” and hers are “right”. You can imagine how much I enjoy her company.

As people of Faith, we must define our values and use them to guide our decisions and our relationships without judging or imposing on others. We do this to live a value-filled, God-honoring life that furthers His kingdom. Without the “road map”, we are simply floating through life with no real direction, at risk for a severe detour from God’s plan for our lives at any moment.

Just as organizations almost always define a value or mission statement for themselves that assists them, and everyone involved with them, in clearly knowing who they are and where they are going, we too need to create a value statement of our own.

This activity is designed to help you define what your most important values are, in what ways you are currently staying true to those values and in what ways you are not, and you will develop a personal value statement that will assist you in the future with value-driven decisions. Once you have selected your 10 values, write 1-2 sentences for each one — and then finish with your Personal Values Statement. Your paper should be 1-2 pages in length.

Write your paper in Microsoft Word and format it according to APA standards. Please review the Guidelines for APA Style. Click on the Session 4 Journal Entry Personal Values Statement link to submit your assignment by the posted due date. Review the rubric available in Due Dates and Grades for specific grading criteria.For this assignment, you will complete an activity designed to help you create a Personal Values Statement for yourself. Complete the Personal Values Checklist

Personal Values Checklist – Alternative Formats activity.

(Adapted from Checklist for Personal Values by C. Roberts, Fifth Discipline Fieldbook)

Values are qualities that are considered worthwhile. They are our highest priorities and deeply held beliefs and driving forces. Often our values are so deeply ingrained in our subconscious that we no longer recognize when our decisions are guided by values. Our values can help us make decisions that keep us on a chosen path in life.

When values are not clearly defined, we can be easily drawn in unhealthy directions. For example, if a person was raised in a family that highly valued sexual purity, but did not clearly define that value in him/herself, it will be very easy for that person to be led into a relationship that does not respect sexual purity. If a company does not define its values, it might be drawn into business decisions (such as utilizing sweat shops overseas to save money) that can eventually hurt the business.

Strongly held values can help us make relationship decisions. They assist us in choosing relationships that help us maintain our own values. For example, it could be difficult for someone who highly values healthy living to spend quite a bit of time with a couch potato addicted to potato chips and video games without eventually compromising his/her own values. However, we must be careful not to judge others with differing values. While we might respect the individual who highly values exercise and good nutrition, our couch potato who highly values enjoying relaxation, entertainment, fun and good food may deserve a measure of respect as well. Many Christian values are not clearly set forth for us, leaving us the freedom to decide for ourselves what value priorities best serve our walk with Christ. What we must be cautious of, in our relationships with others, is too quickly judging and rejecting those who do not share our personal Christian values.

I have a friend who is a vegetarian. This is a very strongly held value of hers. She proudly announces it on a bumper sticker; she talks about it in conversation and reads about it incessantly. She likes to share about her life-changing experience that led to this strong conviction. I, on the other hand, am about the furthest thing from a vegetarian. I was born and raised on a Midwest farm, love a nice, pink, juicy steak, and just simply try never to think about those poor chickens that live in small cages so that I can enjoy that great chicken fettuccini for supper. We hold very different values in this area, my friend and I, but because we respect each other’s values, we do not judge the other, or treat them poorly, because of our differing values.

On the other hand, I have an acquaintance who highly values homeschooling. She takes great pride in staying home with her children and educating them in her home. While I can respect these values and I respect her decision to do so, I myself take great pride in my career and feel strongly that my children will benefit from a public education and the social and educational opportunities it offers them. Notice that I did not state that this person was a friend of mine! This person chooses to try and “impose” her values on me when we are together and makes it very clear to me that my choices are “wrong” and hers are “right”. You can imagine how much I enjoy her company.

As people of Faith, we must define our values and use them to guide our decisions and our relationships without judging or imposing on others. We do this to live a value-filled, God-honoring life that furthers His kingdom. Without the “road map”, we are simply floating through life with no real direction, at risk for a severe detour from God’s plan for our lives at any moment.

Just as organizations almost always define a value or mission statement for themselves that assists them, and everyone involved with them, in clearly knowing who they are and where they are going, we too need to create a value statement of our own.

This activity is designed to help you define what your most important values are, in what ways you are currently staying true to those values and in what ways you are not, and you will develop a personal value statement that will assist you in the future with value-driven decisions. Once you have selected your 10 values, write 1-2 sentences for each one — and then finish with your Personal Values Statement. Your paper should be 1-2 pages in length.

Write your paper in Microsoft Word and format it according to APA standards. Please review the Guidelines for APA Style. Click on the Session 4 Journal Entry Personal Values Statement link to submit your assignment by the posted due date. Review the rubric available in Due Dates and Grades for specific grading criteria.

University of Central Florida

Formal Lab reports should be typed double-spaced with 12 pt. font and 1 inch margins. The report should include the following format:

Abstract – brief summary of the entire experiment

– Give an overview of what you will be doing in the lab and the goal of the experiment

  1. Introduction & Background Section – state the objective of the experiment and discuss any relevant theory pertaining to the particular lab being

-What should be included:

    – Background on lability/stability of inorganic complexes.

           – Differences between Co(II) and Co(III) in terms of d-atomic orbital electron distribution

  1.     – Give the structures of the three compounds you will be synthesizing

    – Give all the reactions you performed in the three weeks

    -What information do we learn about a complex from U.V-Vis absorption and FT-IR? How are they different?

    -What are the effects of adding different ligands to Co? Talk about the spectrochemical series and their influence on d-orbital splitting

    – Explain the common ion effect and how it pertains to this lab

Experimental – an explanation of all procedures performed and materials needed to replicate the Must be in paragraph format; no lists.

-Include the synthesis from Part A, B, and C. Please be in your own words

-Don’t include the methods for obtaining the absorption spectrum, FT-IR, or conductivity.

-Do not include personal pronouns (he, she, they, we, etc. )

Observations & Results – clear state all observations taken during the experiment and tabulate results completely showing all calculations for percent yield and related calculations (use proper significant figures and units in calculations).

-Include four figures and 1 table – (create your own tables – do not share tables)

  1.      1.) Absorption spectrum of [Co(NH3)4CO3] NO3

     2.) Absorption spectrum of [Co(NH3)5Cl] Cl2

     3.) Absorption spectrum of Co(NH3)5(H2O)

     4.) FT-IR spectrum of Co(NH3)4CO3 and Co(NH3)5Cl – Properly labeled will vibrational modes

     5.) Table with the conductivity values of the three complexes

Discussion – Paragraph form/Numbered – Do not copy the post lab questions into the report. Just answer the questions.

  1. – Post Lab Questions

– Including Yield Calculations for Part A and B

Couple comments about the following post lab questions

-Part C Q1: Omit this question – It’s in the results section

-Part C Q2: Resistivity is 1/Conductivity

       – Don’t calculate cell constant, specific conductivity, and molar conductivity

– Part C Q3: Omit this question

– Part C Q4: Answer this question

– Part C Q5: Answer this question

  1. – Part C Q6: You can answer this – Assume the concentration is 1 mM

– Part C Q7: Answer this question but describe the differences in the absorption maxima. What is accounting for those differences?

– Part C Q8: Answer this question

– Part C Q9: Answer this question

– Part D Q1: Put a table with the assigned vibrational mode and the associated wavenumber

– Part D Q2: Answer this question – try your best

– Part D Q3: Omit this question because you should’ve assigned your spectrum in the results section.

– Part D Q4: Good question. Do you think there are any NO3 vibrational modes? If so, where should they be? And what would happen if the NO3 was coordinated to the Co?

– Part D Q5: This is a good question. How do you know you coordinated the CO3? How would the spectrum look with only CO3?

– Part D Q6: Create a table for the Co(NH3)5Cl complex

– Part D Q7: What bands do you think are absent?

– Part D Q8: Answer this question

– Part D Q9: Answer this question

Include the percent yields after the post lab questions so:

– Part A Q6

– Part B Q5

Conclusions – summarize the purpose of the experiment and state with reasoning the experiment was successful or not and how it could potentially be

– What issues did you have? How could you fix them? What would you like to do next in terms of inorganic synthesis?

University of Central Florida

Writing About Research & Structuring the Research Essay

When a writer begins to plan a research essay it can feel overwhelming – there is so much research gathered and information to choose from, but where to start? For an inquiry-based research essay, which follows a question and considers the significance of researched information on an audience, it makes sense to structure the essay around that significance.

The writer can start to structure the essay simply, by asking: what should I tell readers I want to discuss (Introduction); what is the main idea I want to get across to readers (Thesis); what are the key ideas around that main idea that I want to convey (Paragraphs); and what is the most significant point I want readers to take away from reading this essay – what is the one thing I want them to understand (Conclusion). With that basic structure identified, the writer can build from there by developing paragraphs based on evidence in the sources found, and by expanding on ideas or refining them so they are clear and concise.

Just like building a house, a solid foundation is important – ideas are like the framing and concrete foundation on which you add evidence (basic floors, walls, wiring, plumbing) that there is a house, you expand on that evidence with detail to convey the significance of this particular house (tile or wood flooring, kitchen cabinets, bathroom fixtures), and you connect all the parts so that house is one cohesive unit (maybe open concept with a modern theme). If that metaphor doesn’t work, think of building the perfect sandwich or burger or taco with the foundation, the toppings, and the bread/bun/tortilla holding it all together as one cohesive unit.

As the writer writes and revises through several drafts of the essay, expanding on ideas in greater detail, providing evidence in support of those ideas, and providing analysis about the evidence and how it supports, contradicts, or otherwise frames an idea, continues until the essay is a much more robust and fully-formed version of its initial structure.

A writer might prefer to start by creating a diagram or cluster map of ideas – something visual to represent ideas and how they relate to one another. Whether a simple diagram on a post-it note, an elaborate mapping scheme, a traditional outline, or a written reflection of statements, writers generally have some sort of structure to guide them as they begin a research essay and to provide structure as they continue to build on that foundation. The CARS model (Links to an external site.) is also helpful.

Writing About Research

Writers often find a simple self-reflection to be the best place to start thinking about how to organize thoughts. In a five-minute free write, describe as much as you can to answer the following questions about your topic – this will help develop a structure for your essay:

  1. What is interesting to know about this topic?(choose any topic )
  2. What has already been said about it – what did you find in the research?
  3. What is important/interesting about what has been said – what matters most?
  4. What do I know now about this topic that I didn’t understand before researching?
  5. What do I think is important to say about what I now understand?
  6. What one thing is most important to say – what one thing do I want readers to take away from reading my essay about this topic?

This should give you some basic ideas about what to write about from your research. But it’s not enough to just report on what your research sources provide. You have to organize all the information into your own ideas about the topic. This resource on organizing (Links to an external site.) might be helpful. Use the following to further develop a potential structure for your research essay:

Developing a Potential Structure

  1. Introduce the research problem or question and the rationale for exploring it.
    • Explain the issue or the problem
    • Describe the surrounding context if relevant
    • What would make someone curious about it? What would make someone want to read more about the topic? 
  2. Establish the significance of the problem or question and why readers should care about it.
    • How many people are affected?
    • What aspects of our society are affected?
    • What difference will it make in people’s lives?
    • Why is this particular question significant? 
  3. Describe and analyze what has already been written or said by others about the topic.
    • Who has made a significant contribution to the conversation (existing research) about this?
    • Who are the strongest, most credible voices in the conversation?
    • What have they said and how does that relate to your research question?
    • What important questions do these other voices raise for you? 
  4. Explain what you find to be the most significant or key answer to the research question?
    • In the end, which voices were most convincing? Why?
    • What aspects of the conversation turned out to be most important? Why?
    • What might you add to the conversation?
    • What do you want to say?
  5. Describe what you’ve come to understand about the topic that you didn’t fully appreciate when you began the project. What is left to explore? What would others still want to know?
    • What difference will the discoveries you made about your topic make in your life? In your readers’ lives? In the lives of any specific audience to which your essay might be targeted?
    • What do you remain curious about?
    • What questions remain unanswered or what issue is unresolved?
    • What directions might you take if you were to continue the inquiry?

Now go back and identify anything you can’t answer, any areas you might need more sources to support, or any questions that come up. Even if you can’t answer all the prompts above, do you have enough to develop a structure for your essay that will guide your writing. Can you imagine using this structure to build on – can you imagine adding evidence from various sources to each of your points? Can you envision how you might provide analysis of all that evidence? Can you determine a clear thesis that represents your essay and to which all your other points will connect? Can you see ahead to a possible conclusion that gives readers a sense of what’s most important to know about your topic?

University of Central Florida

1-Alternative Future

In this week’s assigned reading, Gray and Hovav (2007) describe four alternative futures for MIS. Which of these scenarios do you consider the most LIKELY to materialize by 2020 (as mentioned by the authors, although perhaps we should now be thinking in terms of 2025 or 2030), and why? Which of these scenarios do you consider the most DESIRABLE, and why? Make sure that your answer and explanation are oriented from the perspective of an industrial engineer and not simply from a position of being an information technology user or enthusiast. What contributions can the industrial engineering profession make toward assuring that the most desirable scenario ends up being the most likely scenario (even if you picked the same scenario as both most likely and most desirable)?

Response Guideline

Because the semester ends officially on Monday, this assignment — both initial and response postings — is due completely on Monday evening. Post your response of 1-3 paragraphs (about 100-250 words) early in the day to give everyone a chance to read it and respond this evening. There will be no penalty for response postings that are entered during the semester study day on Tuesday.

2 – What will I learn?

Imagine that you are approached by an IEMS student who is looking to take this class in a future semester. They ask you to describe for them what they will learn when they take the course. What would you tell them?



COURSE OBJECTIVES

This course is designed to provide opportunities for graduate engineering students to expand their understanding of management information systemsfundamental topics and issues. Upon completion of this course, the successful student will be able to:1.Describe the various technical, organizational, and managerial considerations of various management information systems types and scenarios;2.Integratethe tools and techniques of MIS into the thought processes of industrial engineering;3.Evaluate capabilities and issues that surround the process capability and maturity of organizations implementing and using management information systems;4.Understand theimplications of a variety of emerging technologies for the use of advanced MIS solutions to affect organizational capability and change; and5.Evaluate any social or ethical issues that might impact any decisions to develop or implement an MIS solution in response to organizational problems or concerns.

University of Central Florida

Aggregate Health Disparities

Objectives:

Use the concepts of aggregate at risk and health disparities for assessing needs and planning care.

Describe social determinants of health that impact the health disparity of the at-risk aggregate.

Determine the health status of the at-risk aggregate by interpreting demographic, epidemiological, and statistical data.

Analyze current data concerning the at-risk aggregate (Healthy People 2030).

  1. Formulate three prioritized outcomes with intervention strategies at each level of prevention (primary, secondary, tertiary) for the at-risk aggregate.

Assignment  

  1. Healthy People 2030 (Links to an external site.) (Links to an external site.)
  2. County Health Rankings: How healthy is your County (Links to an external site.)
  3. Develop a power point presentation about the MANAGEMENT OF POLYCYSTIC OVARIAN SYNDROME IN Latin American FEMALES AGED BETWEEN 25-30 IN MIAMI DADE COUNTY that addresses the following areas:

Provide demographic and epidemiological data for the at-risk aggregate

  1. Specify if you are focusing on Prevention or Management of the health disparity (e.g., prevention of diabetes in Latino teens between the ages 13-18 attending Seminole County Schools; versus management of diabetes in Latino teens between the age of 13- 18 attending Seminole County Schools

Introduce the aggregate and the associated disparity. Include demographics, epidemiological and statistical data.  Pictures and graphics add to the presentation. Be sure to cite the sources of these materials and be aware of copyright issues!! 

Delineate social determinants of health and key legislation (if any) at national level. Include Healthy People 2020 objectives and supporting statistics related to the at-risk aggregate.

Select one problem, need or risk of this aggregate.

Develop the plan of care (intervention strategies) that addresses each level of prevention (primary, secondary, tertiary). Remember that you are writing the plan in the role of the public health nurse.

Consider development stages of your target population. (e.g., teaching a group of 1st grades about preventing obesity will be quite different from teaching a group of 5th graders versus students in junior high; or a group of elderly individuals at the senior center).

University of Central Florida

ASSIGNMENT 1 :

As you develop your Research Proposal, you should revisit the Project 1 Overview and the guidelines of P1 to be sure you are completing all the project requirements. The following areas must be thoroughly addressed in the Research Proposal:

  • What is the specific topic are you exploring for P1? Be as detailed as possible and include any subtopics you might explore. Provide a summary and brief review of your topic, complete with information about the significance of this topic and the purpose of communicating about it.
  • What question are you following to guide and organize your research? What have you discovered so far and what do you want to discover about your topic?
  • Who is your anticipated audience? Why would the research you’re planning to write about matter to your anticipated audience? What appeals to them? What are their values?
  • What information have you found so far from your sources, and how well do those sources support your proposed topic? Do you have one or more key ideas you want to feature in your essay, and what are they if so? Explain in detail. What other sources do you think you might need going forward? What source material/evidence are you missing?
  • Thoroughly explain your proposed approach to fully researching your topic for the research essay in P2. What kinds of research will you look at in addition to what you have already found? Where will you search for additional sources (not search engines or the library, but which scholarly journals or other sources might be applicable?) Which popular sources might you search for? Where are the gaps in your research that you hope to fill in?

In addition, the Research Proposal must be an organized, academic piece of writing of 3- to 5-pages that is free of grammatical errors and displays a formal writing style. While lower-order-concerns like spelling and grammar are not the most important components of P1, they should be considered to ensure the final draft meets academic writing expectations. Finally, any sources you have found through your initial research should be in MLA or APA format, or another academic format you choose (with instructor approval). This includes a works-cited page and in-text citations.

Below you will find three student samples of research proposals that are from another type of writing class but they are included here because they provide examples of well-structured thinking and robust and effective research proposal writing that can be used to model your own proposal.

After revisiting the Project 1 requirements, going over formatting guidelines, and looking at the sample research proposals, please complete and submit a final checklist for your P1 final draft. Map out what you already have done and what more needs to be completed before you submit the your final draft.

assignment 2 : Project 1

To begin the semester, students identify a research question that interests them and prepare a 3- to 5-page proposal outlining some of the current research in this area and planning their own expanded research. This proposal serves as a basis for Project 2. The guiding questions for Project 1 are: “What do I know about research and sources? How do I know which sources are right for my purpose? How do I evaluate sources?” my topic is about computer science




University of Central Florida

The Research Critique

The purpose of the critique assignment is to give the students an opportunity to critically appraise (critique) a nursing research article. This assignment will examine how you identify and appraise components of a research study. This assignment is NOT a critique of the topic- it is a critique of the research process used. Your job is to critique or evaluate the quality of the research study itself- like you have been doing all semester!

For example, is there enough evidence or what evidence do the researchers give to allow you to determine if sound research was conducted? For example, if a question asks “were the instruments reliable and valid for this population?” It is not sufficient to state only “yes” or “no”. You must support your opinion with information you learned in class (such as citing Cronbach alpha levels and/or construct validity or other measure / techniques that allowed you to determine if the instruments were reliable and/or valid). Think about everything we have talked about in class when you are formulating your answers to this assignment. By the end of this assignment, I need to see evidence that you understand the components of research and how they fit, or do not fit, together in your article. Dazzle me with your knowledge! You will be graded on how well you describe the components of research and how well you critique how the authors have conducted their study and presented it to the reader. Remember, not all research is good research.

Students should select an article from their area of interest that is QUANTITATIVE and discusses one single study.  Articles that look at multiple studies (meta-analysis, metasynthesis, etc.) are wonderful resources, but are not appropriate for this assignment, as we are learning to critique single studies.  Articles that are qualitative are also wonderful resources, but they do not align with the critique guidelines for this assignment and are not appropriate here.  Save those qualitative and specialty articles for your Research Synthesis Final Project.

Review Practice Exercise 3Links to an external site. in the Nursing Research Guide/Library Module for guidance on how to find Quantitative studies.   YOUR ARTICLE MUST BE QUANTITATIVE.  The critique questions and the grading rubric are based on quantitative research.  If you select a different article type, you will lose most of the available points on this assignment.  In previous semesters, students using the wrong article type have earned less than 50% of possible points on this assignment.  Some questions you may want to ask before proceeding with this assignment:

  • What is the research design and method of my study?
    • Appropriate:  Randomized-controlled trial; descriptive survey; contains statistical analysis
    • Not appropriate:  Qualitative, Interview, mixed-method, case report/study; expert opinion; multiple article review (meta-synthesis or meta-analysis)

While the formatting of that critique is written and your assignment will be a slide show, the content is similar.  

Please remember, you will most likely paraphrase information from your article in this assignment. A few short quotes are acceptable- if properly cited- but please do not rely too heavily on quotes as this does not tell the instructor that you understand and are able to interpret the questions being asked, only that you know how to cut and paste.

Do This:

1.  Read all instructions on this page, including rubric.  Read example in the text. 

2.  Select a quantitative article.

3.  Make sure it is QUANTITATIVE!

4.  Create a slide presentation 

University of Central Florida

This discussion post is optional but if you create an original post AND comment on someone else’s post in a constructive and reflective manner, you can earn 2 points extra credit per module discussion post. Posts are due by NOON Wednesday each week. Please use full sentences and proper grammar and punctuation. You cannot post in later weeks to this discussion hoping to earn extra credit.

For this module, reflect on the following:

What do you think is the future for newspapers? Do you or your parents read a newspaper, either in paper or digital (online) format, or follow the social media feed of a newspaper(s)? Do you think it matters if newspapers die off in the paper format, and what do you think would replace them?

Peer:

I believe newspapers will eventually be completely digital and the paper format will cease to exist anymore. Once the loyal consumers who have always received their news from the paper format are gone, I think companies will have no choice and will be forced to go completely digital. In the future, once every generation has become accustomed to the internet, I think the traditional newspaper will seem outdated. Even today, I think we are starting to see this transition. No one I know still buys a newspaper. I do not get any news from a newspaper today and neither do my parents. We all get all of our information and news from the internet. However, I do not think this transition is as dramatic as some may make it seem. While I can understand how those who have read a physical newspaper for a majority of their life feel sentimental or emotional about this transition, future generations will not have this connection that this past generation of consumers has. I think the important thing in this transition is that companies still provide reliable, accurate, and insightful news to society. If the format has to change from a traditional paper to an all digital to accomplish this, I think that the change is worth it. Virtually, the only aspect of the news that is changing is the format that consumers are receiving it in. 

University of Central Florida

1. Stat: Write your own version of the command line program stat, which simply calls
the stat() system call on a given file or directory. Print out file size, number of blocks
allocated, reference (link) count, file permissions, and file inode.
Useful interfaces: stat()

2. List Files: Write a program that lists files in the given directory. When called without
any arguments, the program should just print the file names. When invoked with the -l
flag, the program should print out information about each file, such as the owner, group,
permissions, and other information obtained from the stat() system call. The program
should take one additional argument, which is the directory to read, e.g., myls -l
directory. If no directory is given, the program should just use the current working
directory.
Useful interfaces: stat(), opendir(), readdir(), getcwd().
2

3. Tail: Write a program that prints out the last few lines of a file. The program should be
efficient, in that it seeks to near the end of the file, reads in a block of data, and then goes
backwards until it finds the requested number of lines; at this point, it should print out
those lines from beginning to the end of the file. To invoke the program, one should type:
mytail -n file, where n is the number of lines at the end of the file to print.
Useful interfaces: stat(), lseek(), open(), read(), close().

4. Recursive Search: Write a program that prints out the names of each file and directory
in the file system tree, starting at a given point in the tree. For example, when run without
arguments, the program should start with the current working directory and print its
contents, as well as the contents of any sub-directories, etc., until the entire tree, root at
the CWD, is printed. If given a single argument (of a directory name), use that as the root
of the tree instead.

University of Central Florida

I’m working on a writing question and need an explanation to help me study.

respond directly to ONLY the two (2) questions below related to that GCP Outcome selection. Your response should be at least 250 words.


If you selected Self-Awareness:

a. In what ways do you think this experience enhanced your ability to
explore how your worldview is shaped by your values, identity, cultural
rules, and biases?

b. Why do you think this experience enhanced your ability to explore your worldview?


If you selected Willingness:

a. In what ways do you think this experience enhanced your
willingness to participate in community service, research, and/or study
abroad programs that strengthen communities and improve lives?

b. Why do you think this experience enhanced your willingness to participate in these kinds of programs?


If you selected Practice:

a. In what ways do you think this experience enhanced your ability to
effectively communicate with people who have different points of view
and/or cultural backgrounds to resolve conflict?

b. Why do you think this experience enhanced your ability to
effectively communicate with people who have different points of view
and/or cultural backgrounds to resolve conflict?


If you selected Knowledge:

a. In what ways do you think this experience enhanced your ability to
identify and describe major global issues, and the way they are
experienced across different cultural systems?

b. Why do you think this experience enhanced your ability to identify
and describe major global issues, and the way they are experienced
across different cultural systems?


If you selected Analysis:

a. In what ways do you think this experience enhanced your ability to
analyze cultures, global issues, and global systems as complex systems
and challenge their histories and impacts?

b. Why do you think this experience enhanced your ability to analyze
cultures, global issues, and global systems as complex systems and
challenge their histories and impacts?


If you selected Synthesis:

a. In what ways do you think this experience enhanced your ability to
assess, incorporate, and communicate context-appropriate ideas and
actions to address global and cultural issues?

b. Why do you think this experience enhanced your ability to assess,
incorporate, and communicate context-appropriate ideas and actions to
address global and cultural issues?

the whole thing related to the internship but same idea and I chose self/awareness.

University of Central Florida

my group and I have a research to do, and I have to do a few parts of the reseach, totaling in 5 pages, the research talks about the telecommunication industry (as a whole) no specific company, but if you will pull up an info about on of the companies you have to do the same for the other companies. 

my part is about the “porters five forces” but not all of it, I have to talk about the following points: 

1. The Power of Buyers (Include as a sub-heading)  ( a page and a half is required, more is fine)

Research: If you were studying steel production, you would look up information regarding whether the steel production companies or their customers (those who purchase steel) have more power. One way to think about this is when they sit down together to talk about the sales price of the steel, who is more influential in the negotiation? Don’t forget to state the overall level of strength of this force for your industry as high, medium, or low. Be sure to discuss the relevant criteria for this force.

Report: Detail your research findings regarding the force. Also, discuss how it impacts the attractiveness of the industry in just one or two sentences.

2. The Power of Suppliers (Include as a sub-heading)   (a page and a half is required, more is fine)

Research: If you were studying steel production, you would look up information regarding whether the steel production companies or their suppliers (industries that produce the inputs to steel production) have more power. Similarly to the power of buyers section, one way to think about this is when they sit down together to talk about the sales price of the input (e.g., iron ore), who is more influential in the negotiation? Don’t forget to state the overall level of strength of this force for your industry as high, medium, or low. Be sure to discuss the relevant criteria for this force.

Report: Detail your research findings regarding the force. Also, discuss how it impacts the attractiveness of the industry in just one or two sentences.

<<and the last TWO points is about>> (requires two pages, more is good)

Summary of Forces and Attractiveness (Include as a sub-heading) 

After you have gone through all five forces, assess the overall attractiveness of the industry.

Report: Provide a summary of your analysis of all of the key forces and what they mean for the industry. Clearly state your conclusion regarding the overall industry attractiveness and why. Base this on the perspective of a company that already operates in the industry. Note – if the industry is segmented, be sure to include a brief discussion of that fact and how the forces might differ across the different segments.

Companies in the Strongest/Weakest Positions 

Research: Identify a minimum of three individual companies in the industry. Identify a leading company, a moderately successfully company, and a company that is struggling. Base your selection primarily on each company’s relative position based on their performance in the industry. Recall that each industry measures performance in a unique way.

Report: In addition to their position based on their performance, identify how each firm has positioned, or tried to position, themselves, in their industry. Identify characteristics that differentiate the companies from each other based on quality/price, geographic coverage, vertical integration, product line breadth, distribution, or service. Your team may want to build a strategic group map (if appropriate) to better illustrate the findings in this section.

University of Central Florida

I’ll upload my simple pendulum from my previous lab. Most the information included in my simple pendulum. Please read the all instructions clear then ask me if you any questions about it. It’s simple assignment.I’ll upload an example for this assignment. Also, I’ll provide also the pictures of my lab manual if needed.

These all the instructions please make sure you include everything in the instructions and please feel free to ask any questions about the assignment.

Basically you have to make a pendulum again like we did in the first lab. We attach a ball or something and record the trial 6 times. You have to use a different amount of string each time. Like in trial 1 u use 1m of string, then in 0.90m of string etc.

Then u enter the values into excel.

u record the time it takes the pendulum to move back and fourth 3 times (oscillations). you do that 6 times.

but each trial is done twice.

after we do all that time recordings we do the LINEST for our data like we did on the last 2 labs.

you also have to find the average, period, and period squared but that’s easy bc they tell u how to do it in canvas.

( exact the instructions):

You will use your simple pendulum from the previous lab. Or, if you wish, make a new simple pendulum with enough string so that you can vary the length at least 6 times. You will need a digital timer such as your phone.

Excel spreadsheet format (starting from A1 and through F1 for column labels):

Length Trial 1 Trial 2 Average Period Period-squared

1.Look over your experimental design. Make sure you can release the bob at an angle less than 10 degrees and at the SAME POINT each time.

2.Measure the length of the string from where it is tied and go down to the center of gravity of the bob. Record all the different lengths that you use starting in second cell of column A of your Excel Spreadsheet (Record in meters).

3.(IMPORTANT SPECIFIC INSTRUCTION FOR THIS LAB). For a given length, simultaneously release (ALWAYS from the same point) the bob and start the timer. Let it oscillate three complete oscillations. Place the amount of time it took to complete these three oscillations starting in the second cell of column B (cell B2). Repeat this timing event for this length and place that value in column C. Finally, in column D in cell 2, type (without the quotes), “=AVERAGE(B2:C2)”. So, you are timing the time it takes for three oscillations twice so you can take the average of these as your final value.

5.Repeat the process for at least 5 other lengths; placing the time for three oscillations (trial one) in column B and (trial 2) in column C. Go to cell D2 again and copy the formula down by clicking on the bottom-right corner and dragging it down. Now you have average values for three oscillation times down to cell D7 (a total of six different lengths).

6.In cell E2, type, “=(D2)/3”. This will give the time for ONE oscillation.

Recall the formula for the period of a simple pendulum:

𝑇=2𝜋𝐿𝑔‾‾

T

=

2

π

L

g

Let us now linearize this:

𝑇2=4𝜋2𝑔𝐿

T

2

=

4

π

2

g

L

Accordingly,

𝑌𝑇2

Y

T

2

𝑋𝐿

X

L

slope = 4𝜋2𝑔

4

π

2

g

7.In cell F2, type the equation “=E2^2”. Copy the formula down. This is your “Y” column. Here you are simply squaring the period.

8. Plot Y vs. X by clicking on column A (hold “shift”) and click column F. Just highlight the values in column A, hit shift, and then highlight the values in column F if it makes it easier. Insert graph and chose the appropriate xy-scatter plot showing your data. Label the graph.

9. Highlight a 2 x 5 matrix as you have done before. Run a LINEST with column F being the y-values, column A being the x-values. Click TRUE,TRUE naturally.

10. Call 𝛽≡4𝜋2𝑔

β

4

π

2

g

. 𝛽𝑖𝑑𝑒𝑎𝑙=4.02𝑠2𝑚

β

i

d

e

a

l

=

4.02

s

2

m

. Report your 𝛽

β

value AND its uncertainty.

11. Save the file and upload.

University of Central Florida

For each prompt you may use one of the following religions: Santería , Haitian Vodou, Obeah/Myal, Candomblé , Rastafari, Espiritismo. Each of the prompts in this assignment requires students describe the multiple aspects of global/cultural systems in order to provide the audience with information about that religion. Additionally, the prompts require student’s self-awareness as they explore their worldview and how it is shaped by their personal values, identity, cultural rules and biases so they are able to help the audience be self-aware and relate to the religions more objectively.

Human Rights Advisory Presentation (power point or short 2-4 pg paper) – This prompt should be modeled as though you were giving a talk to the Human Rights Advisory. You need to make sure you are clear about the social issue and how it relates to this audience.

You will be speaking to the Human Rights Advisory about Religion X and their stand on Social Issue X. You must include in your presentation why their values, beliefs, and culture are incorporated into their stand on Social Issue X and why it is significant to Religion X.

This assignment makes students critically analyze the way society perceives the Afro-Caribbean Religions and the impact that stigmatization has on practitioners. Each of the five prompts encourages students to step out of their comfort zone and attempt to describe the beliefs, values, cultural understanding of one of the religions from the course. The assignment inherently incorporates the SLOs.

The GCP Assignment will be graded based on the student’s ability to describe the multiple aspects of the religion chosen for the prompt, global and cultural. The information should briefly include the way the religion is situated in the larger history of the slave trade and African Diaspora. Additionally, students should approach the religion and topic with respect and objectivity. This demonstrates the student has reflected on their own beliefs, values, cultural rules and biases and are prepared to discuss another religion without dismissal. 

University of Central Florida

Please read the instructions carefully to know what you should do.

This assignment is very easy, and it will not take more than half an hour to complete it. So please try your best to do it.

As an exercise in understanding genre, consider this situation:

You’ve been involved in a car accident, but you’re okay and no one else is hurt. But your car is damaged and has to be towed. And you were on your way to your Biology mid-term and now you’re going to be so late you might miss the exam. You also feel bad because the car was a gift last year from your grandparents, and they saved their money to be able to give it to you. You don’t know what to do or where to start. Believe it or not, there’s some writing that might be required in this situation.

One example of writing in this situation might be the accident report that a responding police officer has to write. An insurance agent has to write a follow up report using that police report and an interview with you and the other drivers’ insurance companies. There is also the email you’ll have to write to your Bio professor explaining why you missed the mid-term and pleading for a make-up exam, despite his policy of no make-ups. You might text a friend for moral support or a ride, as your car has to be towed away. You want to explain to your grandparents in an email (because that’s how they communicate with you in writing) that the accident wasn’t your fault but you feel bad anyway because you really appreciated that they picked out this car for you to attend college.

For this scenario, strategize how each genre would be written if you were the writer – the accident report, the insurance report, the email to your professor, the text to your friend, and the email to your grandparents:

  • Think of the audiences, some of which are very obvious and direct and some that are complex and not so obvious
  • Consider the purpose for each genre in the scenario
  • How would you approach the writing for each scenario? Not knowing how to create a police report or insurance report since you’ve probably never done one of those, just think about what you imagine would be the content of such a report.
  • Consider what is appropriate for each genre — the language you would use, whether the tone was formal or not, how much you would write, and what points you would make.

Practice reflection:

Using the sources you have found in your major or discipline, consider the genres and how they are written. Discuss audience, purpose, and context or situation – what do you see in them? Consider this practice for your reflection.

University of Central Florida

Reading Experience

Reflect on your reading and writing experiences this semester. Describe at least two pieces of literature that we have read this semester that you found to be the most memorable or interesting or challenging.

Reply to the post

I enjoyed most of the reading experiences this semester. Except for when we read the Great Gatsby over 1 week, I did not find many of the readings to be time-consuming as we never had to read more than a dozen pages a week, or a couple of poems altogether. While some of the readings, especially the poems, may have been challenging to interpret, all of the time that I saved from the readings being short helped me better understand and prepare for the exams. This was a huge beneficial difference for me compared to my other class experiences where I had to read more than 100 pages a week (not to mention, the readings in this class were enjoyable)! My favorite readings were the Great Gatsby and the World War I poems by Sassoon and Owen.

Aside from the Great Gatsby not being a long novel, I simply enjoyed it. It was not difficult for me to get engaged when I started reading it. What stood out to me is that the novel was not only one main adventure of Gatsby pursuing Daisy but two adventures – we had to embark on a “separate first adventure” to find out who Gatsby was in the first place. Amid Gatsby’s slow emergence and even before we found out about his past, I already felt enthusiastic about continuing to read the novel to the end. While this was the longest reading for this class and even though I am not somebody who likes long readings at all, this was my favorite story.

The World War I poems by Sassoon and Owen were very memorable to me because I felt that both of them were emotionally powerful. They strongly contrasted to the romantic era poems that preceded them. In my opinion, it was easy to read a romantic era poem (particularly the ones that romanticized going to war and dying for your country), then forget it and move on, whereas Owen’s poem criticizing them made me “stop and think twice.” Further evaluating Owen’s poem made me feel a powerful connection to it that served as learning a lesson from the past. 

University of Central Florida

Hello, below is the video you should comment at, please add the timing of each comment and make it throughout the video

For the essay, Consider Ta-Nehisi Coates’ epistolary (letter) nonfiction excerpt to his son. You’ll use the epistolary form as a model for this essay #3. Think about what you know a lot about and think about whom you think needs to benefit from your knowledge. It doesn’t have to be some grand thing. Perhaps you know how to navigate RUSH in the most efficient, authentic way possible. Perhaps you know how to devote yourself to both a particular college sport and an academic life. Perhaps you know what it’s like to grow up as the only girl in a family of boys or the only boy in a family of girls. Perhaps you know how to navigate the world from the vantage point of a particular race, gender, class, sexual orientation, religious affiliation, etc. Perhaps you know how to move from your home country and start university in a brand new culture. There are infinite possibilities. Consider what you have learned the hard way that you wish someone else had given you guidance on. Whom can you give guidance to? Address your epistolary/letter essay to that real person. (You don’t, of course, have to show the essay to the person, but use the person as a device to craft the structure of the essay.) The essay should be at least 750 words and should have a great title. It should include specific anecdotes and scenes from your life that will help illustrate your points. As always, specific details can bring your writing to life. Craft and revise the draft before you turn it in so that you get the maximum help from feedback. Details are important so you don’t have to limit yourself to 750 words.

University of Central Florida

Module 14 Discussion: Specialty Research Articles

This week, we will be exploring articles that are not quantitative or qualitative. We will use the phrase “specialty” as a catch all for all other types of research you might encounter. This might be a meta-synthesis or meta-analysis (a collection of qualitative or quantitative articles, respectively), mixed method research (combines quantitative or qualitative) or process improvement articles.

Find a “specialty” article that matches your research focus. I would not suggest using “specialty” as a search term. You might find it helpful to use “meta-synthesis” or “meta-analysis.”

Draw on our previous critiquing discussions and assignments and also on readings from your book. How would you critique this article? What are the findings? Do you trust the findings? Why or why not? Do you want to include this article in your final research synthesis? Why or why not?

Additional Information on Systematic Reviews

In your library search, you can also select the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and then search for your topic (this will retrieve any systematic reviews on your topic). Remember that a systematic review is the highest level of evidence when we are considering article types (Review our level of evidence pyramid on page 123). Think about it this way, if we have a systematic review of 10 articles versus a single study, that is like having 10 experts recommend an intervention versus 1 expert recommending an intervention.

One last note on systematic reviews (both meta-synthesis and meta-analysis). If you are using this article type in your final exam synthesis project, remember that the review is a collection of other studies. There is high value in including a systematic review of the highest level of evidence in your research project. While a systematic review is considered a “good find” when doing a change project on your unit and in the community, you may not use a single study AND a systematic review if the single study is part of that review. For example, if you have a systematic review, written by author Fritz (2021), where five studies are included (Anderson (2020); Baker (2019); Charles (2021); Davis (2020); and Erickson (2020), you may not use any of the single studies as an additional resource. This is considered “double-dipping” and would be misleading to your audience. You have already gotten the expert opinions from these studies. If the author has a different article on the same topic (for example, Baker (2021)), then you could use the different article for your synthesis project.

It is important to mention that when performing a literature review for publication (maybe in grad school :), it is not appropriate to use systematic reviews at all and only primary sources should be included. This is because writing a literature review for publication is, in fact, creating your own systematic review. Further, these two examples on the use of systematic reviews correlate to the differences in the DNP (Doctor of Nursing Practice) degree and the PhD in Nursing degree (Philosophy in Nursing), where DNPs want to use the highest levels of evidence to improve clinical practice and PhDs create new evidence to expand the body of knowledge of nursing.

University of Central Florida

Research Synthesis Project

The purpose of this project is to allow students to synthesize evidence on a clinical NURSING problem. This assignment involves the finding, evaluating and disseminating evidence-based practice recommendations on a selected clinical problem to their classmates as professional peers. This project is to be completed individually.

Review the approved topics list below. Note that all of these topics have a nursing intervention. Additionally, all topics contain the necessary components to write a PICO question. I want you to imagine you are working in one of these settings and you are asked to evaluate an intervention that will improve care for patients in this setting. You know that the intervention should be evidence-based and you want to make the case for using, or not using, this particular intervention. You will review the existing literature and then present a brief slide presentation to your peers. Projects like these are done all the time in hospital units and outpatient settings and this is very representative of the type of projects you may be asked to complete as a bachelor’s prepared Knight Nurse!

Approved Topics

  • Kangaroo Care to improve neonatal outcomes
  • CAUTI protocols in elderly patients to reduce incidence of UTI’s
  • Apps/Smartphones to reduce weight in adults in an outpatient setting
  • Community based nursing interventions for asthma in pediatric patients
  • Sepsis bundle protocols in the ICU/ED for early identification of sepsis
  • Complementary/Alternative therapies to reduce pain in oncology patients
  • Mindfulness interventions to reduce anxiety for adults
  • Fall protocols to prevent injury in adult patients
  • Effectiveness of nursing residency programs on retention of new nurses
  • Effectiveness of simulation (manikin-based) in nursing education
  • Technology/apps/telehealth to improve adolescent mental health

Guidelines

  1. Select a clinical nursing intervention from the provided list. If you would like to use a different intervention, please email the instructor for prior approval to ensure your idea is feasible and appropriate for the assignment. Because the assignment uses the PICO model, your topic MUST have an intervention and focus on outcomes.
  2. Create a PICO question to refine your research question and determine terms for your literature search. Review Module 2, if needed.
  3. Conduct a literature search focusing on research that addresses the effects of nursing interventions on the nursing problem. Remember that you can reach out to the course Librarian, if needed.
  4. Choose three peer-reviewed, evidence-based studies that have your intervention topic. You may use quantitative, qualitative, systematic reviews, or specialty articles (QI or process improvement) that we have learned about in the course. You may not use opinion articles or case studies. Critically read these studies to determine their scientific merit using the guidelines published in your textbook. It might be helpful to review the evidence hierarchies pyramid in our textbook on p. 23. This should be helpful to you in both selecting articles and discussing their strength.
  5. Create a slide presentation for posting to the class in the Discussions area of the course. The presentation must include a minimum of the following:
    1. Brief statement of the critical nursing problem phrased as a PICO statement.
    2. Identification of the studies reviewed.
      1. Summary of each article (1 slide maximum for each study)
      2. Summary of the overall recommendations- from all articles combined. This should be a synthesis where you discuss recommendations from all articles together. You might want to begin with, “In the literature…” A synthesis is not a listing of results (Article 1, Article 2…..)
      3. Strengths and weaknesses of the evidence base- of all articles combined. This should be a synthesis where you discuss recommendations from all articles together. You might want to begin with, “In the literature…” A synthesis is not a listing of results (Article 1, Article 2…..)
  6. Discussion of how these limitations affect the readiness of the recommendations for use in clinical practice. Is there anything that would prevent you from implementing this intervention (cost, staffing…)?
  7. Conclusion that addresses the state of the art on your topic. Would you recommend this intervention or not? Is further research needed? Are higher levels of evidence needed?
  8. A maximum of 10-15 slides including references. Slides should be visually attractive, but must remain professionally tasteful.
  9. Article Selection Guidelines
  • The problem must address a clinical problem in nursing.
  • Remember that sometimes the comparison (C) in a PICO statement can be implied as “compared with no intervention.”
  • At least one of the articles must be from a peer reviewed nursing journal with a nurse as its primary author.
  • Don’t forget to consult your UCF Librarian for assistance if you are having difficulty finding articles – they are EXPERTS at finding exactly what you need and are eager to assist you if you are having problems.
  • You will also need to read and provide substantive comment for peers.
  • If you use a systematic review as one of your articles, remember that a systematic review contains multiple single studies and you cannot use any of the studies included in the review as your remaining articles.
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