Ancient Greece and Rome Discu

 1.) Read the questions below and choose TWO to answer. Your answers should be thorough, meaning at least a full paragraph or more for each essay — answers that are shorter or without analysis will not receive full credit. 

2.) Remember that your answer should be written in your own words, as your own opinion. 

3.) The post is due by the time and date listed on the course syllabus. Please see the syllabus for the late work policy. 

4.) These questions are primarily opinion based, which means you need to explain your point of view thoroughly, respectfully, and on topic (ie, this is not the place to veer off topic or go into a rant). “Wrong” answers that won’t receive credit are answers that are rude, off topic, too short, or without academic analysis. If you want to reply to a classmate, feel free, as long as you are respectful in your reply. This should simulate the usual rules for any class discussion. I will monitor the board and weigh in as students post, and will intervene if the conversation is going in a direction not conducive to learning. 

Discussion Post Questions:

1.) Consider what we have learned about Aristotle and the branch of philosophy known as ethics. Ethical thinking can guide us to a better life, according to the ancient philosophers. Aristotle in particular wrote about moral dilemmas. A moral dilemma is a conflict in which a person must choose between two or more actions, where the “clear” choice isn’t always clear. What would you do, in this scenario: You go out with your husband for dinner at a new restaurant you have not frequented before. It is in a part of town you rarely visit. You are shocked to see your friend’s spouse having dinner with a very young, attractive person. From the way they are behaving, it is obvious they are more than friends. The couple finish their meal and leave without seeing you. They behave very affectionately on the way out the door. Do you tell your friend, knowing you probably will not be believed and that it may ruin your friendship? Or, do you say nothing about seeing the couple as it is none of your business; they may even have an open relationship?

2.) Consider what we have learned about Aristotle and the branch of philosophy known as ethics. Ethical thinking can guide us to a better life, according to the ancient philosophers. Aristotle in particular wrote about moral dilemmas. A moral dilemma is a conflict in which a person must choose between two or more actions, where the “clear” choice isn’t always clear. Read the choices below of the different “players” in this scenario. Choose one, and explain what you would do in his/her shoes:

  • Your name is Andrea. You have studied very hard for the upcoming math test. The day before the test, your friend Marco tells you that he found copies of the math test by the printer in the school computer lab. Marco is your best friend. Do you take the copy of the test if Marco offers it to you? Why or why not? 
  • Your name is Marco. You have found copies of the upcoming math test by the printer. The test is tomorrow. You have not prepared and are not ready for the test. You look around and no one is watching. Do you take the test with you, and let anyone know about it and/or give them a copy too?
  • Your name is Professor Max. You have printed copies of the math test, which the students are taking tomorrow. However, after half an hour, you realize that you have left them by the printer. You go back and you find the copies lying next to the printer. You are worried that some of the students might have seen them but you are not sure. Rewriting the test would require a lot of work and you do not have much time to create an entirely new one. What do you do and how do you proceed? 
  • Your name is Susanna. You are not a friend of Marco. He often bullies you and belittles you in class. You discover that he found tomorrow’s math test by the printer. You have not studied much for the test, but you are also very angry at Marco for months of bullying. Do you turn him in, or do you ask for a copy of the test … or do you do nothing at all?
  • Your name is Professor Smith. You have just seen Marco take the copies of the math test that Professor Max left by the printer. You know the math test is tomorrow and math is not Marco’s strongest subject. You like Marco. You do not like Professor Max because you think that he is arrogant and unfriendly, but you know your obligations as a teacher are to the truth and to fairness for all students. Do you turn Marco in?

3.) Consider what we have learned about Aristotle and the branch of philosophy known as ethics. Ethical thinking can guide us to a better life, according to the ancient philosophers. Aristotle in particular wrote about moral dilemmas. A moral dilemma is a conflict in which a person must choose between two or more actions, where the “clear” choice isn’t always clear. What would you do, in this scenario: Your friend tells you that they committed a crime. They explain that they are having trouble sleeping at night and feel you are the only one they can trust with their confession. A few days later, you read in the paper that someone has been arrested for your friend’s crime. Do you: Go to the police and tell them what you know? Encourage your friend to confess and warn him if he does not do so, you will tell? Say nothing because you will not betray a friend’s confidence?

4.) Consider what we have learned about Aristotle and the branch of philosophy known as ethics. Ethical thinking can guide us to a better life, according to the ancient philosophers. In addition to moral dilemmas, Aristotle also wrote about ethical dilemmas. An ethical dilemma is a conflict where the “right” choice is clear, but it may not necessarily be the choice we make. For example, we know what the law or rules state we should do, but we don’t always choose to follow them… for various reasons we justify to ourselves. What would you do, in this scenario: You receive a package at your home that was delivered to the wrong address. The shipping label indicates it is a favorite item of yours–a really expensive item– that you cannot afford to purchase yourself. But, it’s for your neighbor, who is both rude and unfriendly to you. Do you keep it or notify the person it was intended for? Does your neighbor’s attitude towards you make a difference in what you decide to do? 

5.) Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey and Virgil’s Aeneid are the classic literary works of the ancient world. They were considered so important to the Ancient Greek and Romans that the books were taught as moral guidebooks (and sometimes even as history books!) Who do you think is the better “hero” in the story: Achilles, Odysseus, or Aeneas? If you choose this question to answer, first tell us how you define the word “hero” and then explain why the character of Achilles, Odysseus, or Aeneas fits your criteria. 

6.) Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey and Virgil’s Aeneid are the classic literary works of the ancient world, and introduce a concept to literature called Epithets. Epithets are an adjective or descriptive phrase expressing a quality characteristic of the person or thing mentioned — for example, Aeneas is called “Aeneas, the Faithful”… Penelope is “Penelope, the wise and tender hearted” … Achilles is the “glorious, swift-footed Achilles.” Even in modern day epics, we read about “Harry Potter, the Chosen One.” What would your own epithet be? Tell us what description best fits your personality, temperament, and life, and explain how it illustrates something about you. 

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