450 words due today NEW

75 words

You make a good point.  Linear inequalities can be used in the business world when speaking of production as well as the cost and price management. For the everyday world, figuring out profit/cost margins for small businesses with out definite numbers, budgeting to find a approximation range for the best cost efficient buys and when it comes to figuring out somewhat concrete numbers when there are factors that vary, inequalities are the best way to do so.

 

 

 

75 words

You post on BMI reminded me of the graph that is on the back of panty hose when you’re buying them at the store.  In order to find a pair that fits, you have to know your weight and height.  If the hose is a small, your height and weight must be within the shaded area of the graph for the hose to fit.  If you are taller than the graph shows for the size, you need to bump up to the next size.  The same thing happens for weight.  It’s been a long time since I have purchased panty hose but your post immediately brought a picture of the hose box into my mind.  Your weight and height must satisfy BOTH inequalities for the hose to fit. 

 

 

 

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In math I think most people are visual people which at times makes it easier for us that way when it comes to understanding something.  Illustrations work better than anything when it comes to examples or bringing out the most in something.  Graphing in this part of what we are doing can be tricky especially when there are numbers in the equation.

 

 

 

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I’m so glad that it helped.  I have another favorite website that I like to suggest to students.  It’s not interactive, but it does explain things well with visuals to go with the explanations. The website is called purplemath.com and here’s a link for the section on systems of linear inequalities:  http://www.purplemath.com/modules/syslneq.htm

 

 

 

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Thank you for your response to the DQ this week.  You did a great job on your response.  One note I’d like to make is on the last sentence of the first paragraph.  You mentioned that you can use a point on a dashed or solid line.  We use a dashed line to indicate that the line is not “included” in our solution set and a solid line indicates that it is “included” in our solution set.  So, we can’t use a point on a dashed line, since it’s not in our solution set.  Does that make sense?

 

 

 

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Shelly, the clarity of the reply helped me to zoom into the zone of understanding.  As I was reading over the textbook, I noticed the “one equality” (Rockswold & Krieger, 2003, p. 277), whereas “the equal sign is replaced” (Rockswold & Krieger, 2003, p. 277) the inequalities symbols make an appearance.  The format changes to “linear inequality in two variables” (Rockswold & Krieger, 2003, p. 277).  Furthermore, developing a natural application of knowledge about the region being above the line and below the line is another factor to when applying the inequality symbols (Rockswold & Krieger, 2003).  Again, reading the reply provided me with an edge of information, clarity, and determination to study with highlights, especially when comparing one variable to two variables as the sign changes from equal to the inequality symbols (Rockswold & Krieger, 2003).  The reply covered aspects of the textbook, which I overlooked. 

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