Calculate the Kelvin temperatures of the water and record your answers in the data table. Find the change in the volume of air in the flask from your data and record in data table. Use the equation V1

Calculate the Kelvin temperatures of the water and record your answers in the data table. Find the change in the volume of air in the flask from your data and record in data table. Use the equation V1 / T1 = V2 / T2 to calculate the expected volume of air when cooled in tap water. How do the expected final volume and the actual final volume compare? What is the significance of elevating or lowering the flask until the water level in the flask is even with the water level in the beaker or container? Construct a graph of the data. Plot the volume of the gas at room temperature in tap water and in ice water on the y axis. Plot the Kelvin temperature on the x-axis. Print out graph paper for your plot. (Click here for graph paper.) Extend the plotted line downward until it crosses the temperature axis. This process of extending a graph beyond the experimental data is called extrapolation. At which temperature is the line predicted to cross the x-axis? At which temperature did the line actually cross the x-axis? Account for any deviation betweeen the predicted temperature line extrapolation and the actual line extrapolation. Real World Chemistry – Explain why bottled gas containers are equipped with a relief valve?

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